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My jsfiddle is here http://jsfiddle.net/pedz/YG3bv/

The full page is http://jsfiddle.net/pedz/YG3bv/14/embedded/result/

This is my first attempt at posting jsfiddle pages so let me know if I botched it.

If you view this with Chrome or Safari, the leftmost pixel of the left tip of the little triangle is directly under the rightmost pixel of the underline. This is what I want.

If viewed with Firefox (I'm using 13), the little triangle is moved right by what looks like two pixels.

I've been told that when viewed with IE9, it is moved left one pixel.

I've fiddled with this for days comparing Chrome with FF mostly. If you add in borders to the various elements, then you can determine some of my conclusions.

FF and Chrome agree about the left and bottom but they do not agree about the top nor the right of the parent container. FF has an extra column or two of pixels on the right when compared to Chrome. That is why the arrow is one or two pixels further right.

It also appears, when you put a border around the foo span, that FF moves the text up a pixel when compared to Chrome. The descenders in FF do not touch the border while they do (or very nearly do) in Chrome. Likewise, there is a bit more white space above the text (within the border) in Chrome than in FF. This particular issue I'm not concerned with... its just something I've observed.

What I figure is I need to "reset" some CSS attribute but I've not yet figured out which one I need. That is really my ultimate goal here... to understand what CSS attribute is different between the browsers.

My secondary goal is to come up with a way to get the little triangle in the same place in the different browsers... or a technique to do it. I could add in browser specific Javascript to nudge things one way or the other but, from the net, that sounds like a really bad idea.

Previews:

Preview in Chrome19 Preview in Chrome 19

Preview in IE9 Preview in Internet Explorer 9

Preview in Firefox13 Preview in Firefox 13

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2  
If you are going for 1px precision in web design, buy stock in your favorite brand of pain reliever...you are in for excruciating headaches. –  saluce Jun 15 '12 at 21:15
1  
Check out the edit. I have uploaded the screenshots to help viewers see the problem right upfront. See my answer. You need to use the CSS reset tool to fix the cross browser compatibility issue (in this case Firefox issue). –  vulcan raven Jul 4 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is certainly a very interesting scenario.

Looks like Firefox is rendering a non-breaking space after the <span> with triangle, which is certainly not your intention. This is because span with triangle is nested inside another span.

The tbody in your code looks like:

<td class='upd_apar_def-defect upd_apar_def_dual_button'>
  <span class='foo'>
<a href='some/path' class='upd_apar_def_link'>123456</a><span class='upd_apar_def_span'></span>
  </span>
</td>
<td class='upd_apar_def-apar upd_apar_def_dual_button'>
  <span class='foo'>
<a href='some/path' class='upd_apar_def_link'>987654</a><span class='upd_apar_def_span'></span>
  </span>
</td>

Try replacing it with to resolve the issue:

<td class='upd_apar_def-defect upd_apar_def_dual_button'>
  <span class='foo'>
<a href='some/path' class='upd_apar_def_link'>123456</a><span class='upd_apar_def_span'></span></span>
</td>
<td class='upd_apar_def-apar upd_apar_def_dual_button'>
  <span class='foo'>
<a href='some/path' class='upd_apar_def_link'>987654</a><span class='upd_apar_def_span'></span></span>
</td>

No issues with CSS and rest of your DOM, but apparently Firefox seems to do the right thing (imo).. though its debatable! :-)

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Yes. I discovered this last week but didn't update the question. "Pretty" html isn't my friend. :-( Thank you for your help. –  pedz Jul 4 '12 at 22:36

At a glance, what I'm seeing is that there are no font-size or font-family values set. The content appears to have a different default font-size and/or font-family in different browsers, which may be part of what's causing the layout to vary by browser.

Edit:

After adding font-size and font-family, I still see a difference between FF and Chrome. Adding a traditional reset.css did not appear to have any effect. I suspect that the differences are mainly from trying to apply CSS-layout styling (position:absolute, etc) to HTML table elements (td, etc). That combination may have unpredictable results no matter what you do.

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Thanks for the help. I added a font size and family. One of my experiments I had tried that. As you said, it didn't help. Part of my experimentation was just with div's and spans. I have various jsfiddles of those too. It was based upon those that I concluded that FF and Chrome do not agree on the top or right position of the "offset parent" (the foo span). –  pedz Jun 15 '12 at 22:29
    
I'd trim it down to the simplest possible code that allows you to see the problem occurring, and present it in that form. –  Matt Coughlin Jun 15 '12 at 22:42

Fixed the Firefox issue.

Fixed on Firefox

Fixed on Firefox

I have updated your Fiddler post with additional CSS reset code for cross-browser compatibility from here. Make a local copy of this file or embed in your existing CSS file.

I added the following CSS reset code above /* your CSS starts here */ line:

html,body,div,span,applet,object,iframe,h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6,p,blockquote,pre,a,abbr,acronym,address,big,cite,code,del,dfn,em,img,ins,kbd,q,s,samp,small,strike,strong,sub,sup,tt,var,b,u,i,center,dl,dt,dd,ol,ul,li,fieldset,form,label,legend,table,caption,tbody,tfoot,thead,tr,th,td,article,aside,canvas,details,embed,figure,figcaption,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,output,ruby,section,summary,time,mark,audio,video {
    border:0;
    font-size:100%;
    font:inherit;
    vertical-align:baseline;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}

article,aside,details,figcaption,figure,footer,header,hgroup,menu,nav,section {
    display:block;
}

Hope this help.

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I really don't like this shotgun approach to problem solving. Once one properly sets the required properties to desired values, the reset is no longer doing anything but taking up space. As per the OP, "...really my ultimate goal here... to understand what CSS attribute is different between the browsers." –  Sparky Jul 4 '12 at 16:15
2  
I like it! These kind of resets prevented me from going crazy slicing templates by hand... –  Ties Jul 4 '12 at 16:36
1  
@Sparky672, Check the edits. This is not a shortgun approach really. CSS reset is used by many web-designers out there to fix the common compatibility issues. Besides its hardly 10 line code, what extra space are you talking about? Its minified version is 583 bytes. –  vulcan raven Jul 4 '12 at 16:49
2  
It's a "shotgun" approach because it resets everything, even the elements you're not using. Later in the CSS, you'll over-ride your element's values with your own values, which renders the reset totally superfluous. My point is that your properly written CSS will, in effect, reset just what you use. Besides, the OP wants to learn exactly which properties are causing his problems and this answer tells him nothing about that. –  Sparky Jul 4 '12 at 16:55
1  
@JasonWilliams, the reset code has nothing to do with the case in hand. If you plant that reset code before the OP's CSS without ammending the DOM, it won't tale effect. There is a space after the span with triagnle. See my answer. –  vulcan raven Jul 4 '12 at 22:38

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