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Was reading through some text and playing around with attempting to write past the size of an array in C i.e buffer overflow. The text indicates that whenever you attempt to write to say array[5] when the length of the array is 5 then you get a segmentation fault but I dont seem to be getting that When using the code below. The code actually runs.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
    int i;
    int array[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (i = 0; i <= 255; i++)
    {
        array[i] = 10;
    }
    int len = sizeof(array) / sizeof(int);
    printf("%d\n", len);
    printf("%d\n", array[254]);
}

On execution of the last statement, a 10 is printed. Am wondering whether this is a vulnerability or if there is something I am missing. I am running the code from iterm2 on a macbook pro.

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jun 15 '12 at 21:29

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
This could have something to do with the direction that memory grows on the stack and its relation to the direction the processor traverses memory when sequentially indexing an array. On x86, the stack grows down and the processor walks up the stack, so you can overwrite the calling function's return address. –  AlexWebr Jun 15 '12 at 21:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Writing past the end is Undefined Behaviour- anything may happen.

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1  
would that not imply that someone could modify a different running process? –  cobie Jun 15 '12 at 21:14
1  
@cobie: As far as the C language is concerned, yes. The OS may make a promise that this won't happen, but it is the OS enforcing it, not the language. Of course, this means that your application could, in theory, modify another process's memory in some OSs (though in practice, overflowing by 1 byte probably isn't going to hit another process's memory). –  Brian Jun 15 '12 at 21:34
    
@cobie: Absolutely No - What part of "The behaviour is undefined." do you not understand...... –  mattnz Jun 16 '12 at 7:51
    
@cobie: in modern operating systems, the answer to that is usually "no" (and certainly would be for this trivial case). Different processes have different address spaces which means that, in the normal course of events, they cannot see or write to each other's memory. –  Perry Jun 16 '12 at 20:56

You are writing data past the end of an array. This is undefined behavior. Undefined behavior means it may work on a Friday but crashes on a Saturday.

Here is the C paragraph that says it is undefined behavior:

(C99, 6.5.3.2p4) If an invalid value has been assigned to the pointer, the behavior of the unary * operator is undefined.

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You'll be able to examine any memory owned by your current process. When you hit the end of that block of memory you'll get an EXC_BAD_ACCESS error. Try this amended version of the code that loops until the OS kills it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int i = 0;
    int array[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    while (1)
    {
        printf("%llu - %d\n", i, array[i]);
            // if (&i == &array[i]) printf("Overwriting i\n");
            // array[i] = 2;
        ++i;
    }
}

If you uncomment the commented out lines you should find that you get stuck in an infinite loop between i values of 3 and 6. You're overwriting the memory located at the address of the i integer.

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