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Is there a POSIX function that searches PATH for an executable according to the POSIX spec's description of the PATH environment variable and returns the absolute path to the executable?

If not, is there a simple, safe, standard, and reliable way to search PATH?

Edit: glibc's execvpe() function does its own PATH search, so I'm guessing there isn't a specific PATH search function defined by the standard.

Edit 2: I don't want to copy someone else's code or implement the PATH search myself for a few reasons:

  • DRY
  • More code I have to test and maintain
  • Possible licensing issues
  • POSIX says, "If PATH is unset or is set to null, the path search is implementation-defined." I would like the behavior in these cases to be consistent with whatever the system does, but I can't do this if there's not a standard function I can call.
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execvp and execlp are POSIX standard functions. Are you looking for a function that just searches $PATH? – Fred Foo Jun 15 '12 at 21:55
    
@larsmans: yes, and returns a string containing the full path to the executable (if found) – Richard Hansen Jun 15 '12 at 22:15
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Is there a POSIX function that searches PATH for an executable according to the POSIX spec's description of the PATH environment variable and returns the absolute path to the executable?

No.

If not, is there a simple, safe, standard, and reliable way to search PATH?

Yes and no. Yes, there is a standard for the format of PATH, from which the correctness/reliability of implementations follow.

No, there is no standard function that does this. Copying code is your best bet.

If PATH is unset or is set to null, the path search is implementation-defined.

That means you can't always portably replicate what execvp does, but searching /bin:/usr/bin is a pretty safe bet. Alternatively, just raise an error in this case.

(I admit that it would have been nice if POSIX had had this function, but it just isn't there.)

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The command line tool which will do that. here's the man page

and the source

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I don't consider adapting hundreds of lines of someone else's code to be simple. – Richard Hansen Jun 15 '12 at 22:17
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If there were a simple way to do it, it would've been done already. It's not part of the posix spec. – gcochard Jun 15 '12 at 22:19
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It's very simple. Iterating over the elements of $PATH is a couple lines of C. If anything, the reason it's not in POSIX is that it's too simple, i.e. trivial to do yourself so it didn't merit somebody inventing a new interface. – R.. Jun 15 '12 at 22:37
    
@R..: It's not as easy as two lines of code; witness the size and complexity of the two aforementioned implementations. Some of the issues that have to be dealt with: PATH is null, PATH is empty, PATH starts with :, PATH ends with :, PATH contains ::, reporting user-friendly errors, dealing with idiosyncratic filesystem behavior, etc. – Richard Hansen Jun 15 '12 at 22:48
    
Starting or ending with : is not special; it's a zero-length path component just like ::, which must be interpreted as . (unfortunately). These are all covered by one case after the next path component is obtained. It would be ugly on two lines of code, but I could see writing the whole function cleanly in under 10 lines. – R.. Jun 16 '12 at 1:34

What about doing something like:

FILE *f = popen("command -v somecommand", "r")

and then read its output? This would result in behavior that matches the system's handling of empty/unset PATH, and it may be simpler than manually searching PATH.

There are some drawbacks to this approach:

  • If somecommand comes from the user, it may have to be sanitized to prevent code injection attacks. That would add to the complexity.
  • Reliably reading the stream while handling all possible error cases is not trivial. More complexity.
  • If somecommand is a shell special built-in (e.g., set), it'll return bogus results. This case should be detectable, but then what? More complexity.
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