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EDIT: I have no choice but to code in C for this software, so keep this in mind.

I'm trying to use a parameter list where I compare data from sets of points. There might be a better way to do this but I think I need to call every other argument for comparison.

Basically the function call is as follows:

char * key1 is proprietary and refers to the unique id of a record in our database OSI_RECORD is also proprietary and refering to a record number GET_*_VALUE is also proprietary and is used to point to a specific field using a DOFRI

size_t LAST_OFF ( int argCount, char * key1, ... )
{
va_list     parmlist;
int         dS1, dS2, retValue, nextArg, max = 0;
char        * keyN;
char        * keyS;
OSI_RECORD  ptRecord1;
float       argMax;


va_start( parmlist, key1 );

    nextArg = 2;

    for (size_t i = 0; i < key1; i +=2)
    {

        keyN = va_arg( parmlist, char * );
        keyS = va_arg( parmlist, char * );

        dS2 = GET_STATUS ( keyS );

        if (dS2 = 1) 
        {
            ptRecord1 = GET_R (keyN, "STATUS");
            dS1 = GET_FLOAT_VALUE ( 10, 4, 31, ptRecord1, 0); 

            if ( dS1 > max );
            {
                max = ( dS1 );

                if (nextArg < argCount)
                {
                    argMax = (((float)nextArg + 1 ) / 2 );
                }

                else if (nextArg = argCount)
                {
                    argMax = (1);
                }

            }



        nextArg++;

        }

        else if (dS2 /= 1)
        {

            nextArg++;

        }

    }

    retValue = max;

va_end ( parmlist);

PUT_ANALOG ( key1, argMax );


}

EDIT: here is the current version of the calc. I'm sure there are plenty of things wrong with it but I'm having problems getting it to compile.

Here are the errors I'm getting from my compiler:

 error C2143: syntax error: missing ';' before 'type'
 error C2143: syntax error: missing ';' before 'type'
 error C2143: syntax error: missing ';' before 'type'
 error C2143: syntax error: missing ';' before 'type'
 warning C4047: '<' : 'int' diffes in levels of indirection from 'char *'
 warning C4552: '<' : operator has no effect; expected operator with side-effect
 error C2059: syntax error : ')'
 error C2143: syntax error : missing ':' before '{'
 warning C4244: '=' : conversion from 'float' to 'int', possible loss of data

All but the last two of these warnings are pointed at this line:

 for (size_t i = 0; i < key1; i +=2)
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1  
And your question is? What have you tried? What are the data types involved here? Here is an example of creating a variable argument function. –  dirkgently Jun 15 '12 at 21:45
1  
what does this if argTwo is /=1 mean exactly? –  Blue Moon Jun 15 '12 at 21:46
    
What have you tried? Try simplifying your code or giving us relevant samples. –  sczizzo Jun 15 '12 at 21:50
3  
@EitanT: Yet sometimes necessary. Like any feature, use it when appropriate. There are plenty of complex libraries out there using variadic functions which work just fine. –  Ed S. Jun 15 '12 at 22:25
1  
@EitanT: It is off-topic, but... I can't resist :D. I agree it has problems, but that doesn't change the fact that it is useful at times and is used in very large projects with success (take a look at libtiff which uses them extensively for reading and writing TIFF tag data). I think I agree with you for the most part though. I can't say I find myself using them... well, ever really, but there are valid use cases. –  Ed S. Jun 15 '12 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

else if (nextArg = argCount)

Are you sure you want to assign and not compare?

Basically I need to have, for each key I'm comparing in the va_list, a paired key that is set to equal either 1 or 0. If that key is 0, I skip to the next argument, if it is 1 then I use that argument.

This is pretty easy as long you as remember to pass in the correct argument count and properly ordered arguments. Here's a simple filter function that expects an int array of size at least argc / 2 and variable number of arguments (always even) and returns the selected arguments based on the condition argument immediately following the argument:

size_t filter( int *out, int argc, ... )
{
  assert( argc % 2 == 0 );
  size_t nout = 0;
  va_list vl;
  va_start( vl, argc ); 
  for (size_t i = 0; i < argc; i += 2)
  {
    int val = va_arg( vl, int );
    int cond = va_arg( vl, int );
    if (cond) {
        out[ nout++ ] = val;
    }   
  }
  va_end( vl );
  return nout;
}

Using the function is easy too:

void test() 
{
    int *p = malloc( 4 * sizeof *p );
    if ( p ) {             /*4 pairs*/
        size_t n = filter( p, 4 * 2, 1, 0, 2, -1, -4, 1, 0, 0 );
                                    /*out*/ /*in!*/ /*in*/ /*out*/
        printa( p, n );
        free( p );
    }
}

There are a couple of items (that look like macros) in your code I'm not aware of so you will have to figure out how you can fix your code.

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I'm experiencing some confusion with the "if (cond) {...}" statement. Can you explain it with a little more detail so I can better understand how to modify it for my code? Thanks, –  StrawDog Jun 19 '12 at 23:56
    
The if (p) tests if malloc succeeded or not. If you're confused about the comment then don't be. The comment actually is meant for the above line -- 4 pairs means that I am asking malloc to allocate enough memory for 4 such objects. –  dirkgently Jun 20 '12 at 3:16
    
So on compile I keep getting a "warning 4013: 'assert' undefined; assuming extern returning int". I am including stdio.h. –  StrawDog Jun 20 '12 at 20:32
    
You need to put a #include <assert.h> along with your other header includes. This header contains the declaration for assert. –  dirkgently Jun 20 '12 at 20:39
    
How could you set this up differently? My compiler doesn't like this line: "for (size_t i = 0; i < argc; i += 2)". –  StrawDog Jun 26 '12 at 1:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up using struct to define my pairs. I was able to use my existing code with minimal modifications.

typedef struct 
{
    char * key1;
    char * key2;
} UnitKeyPair;

I passed the UnitKeyPairs into my parmlist fairly simply.

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