Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function in my namespace, ns::foo, whose job is to dispatch an invocation of foo using argument-dependent lookup:

namespace ns
{

template<typename T>
void foo(T x)
{
  // call foo through ADL
  foo(x);
}

}

I want clients to be able to call foo without having to manually instantiate it, i.e.:

bar x;
ns::foo(x);

Not

ns::foo<bar>(x);

The problem of course is that ns::foo is recursive if there is no better match for foo than ns::foo.

I don't wish to give ns::foo a different name, so is there any way to remove it from the overload set inside itself?

share|improve this question
    
You could give it a different name, e.g. fooHelper(), also foo(...) matches everything and is considered before templated function resolution –  Attila Jun 15 '12 at 22:15
    
Could you post a sample of the original foo function that has to be called. If I simply define a void foo(S s) I don't get a recursion, because it it a better match than a template. –  rodrigo Jun 15 '12 at 23:10
    
@rodrigo - My mistake. It recurses when no better match exists (i.e., when there is no void foo(S s). I'd need a compiler error to occur. I didn't specify that in the question so I'll accept your answer. –  Jared Hoberock Jun 15 '12 at 23:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the foo to where you want to dispatch is not in the ns namespace, then this should work:

namespace helper
{
    template<typename T>
    void _foo(T x)
    {
        // call foo through ADL
        foo(x);
    }
}

namespace ns
{
    template<typename T>
    void foo(T x)
    {
      ::helper::_foo(x);
    }
}

The trick is that the call to foo from _foo will not consider ns::foo, because it is not in an argument-dependent namespace. Unless the type of x happens to be in ns of course, but then you have a recursion by definition.

UPDATE: You have to put this code just after the definition of namespace ns:

namespace ns
{
     //your useful stuff here
}
namespace helper { /* template _foo */ }
namespace ns { /* template foo */ }

There is no recursion because the helper::_foo function cannot call the template foo because it is still not defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Unfortunately, in my program, the type of X does happen to be in ns. –  Jared Hoberock Jun 15 '12 at 22:32
    
But then your dispatched foo function will always collide with your templated one. If you really need this, maybe you should consider a good old macro: #define foo _foo in the right place of the header file should do the trick. –  rodrigo Jun 15 '12 at 22:36
    
@JaredHoberock - But again, please try my updated answer. –  rodrigo Jun 15 '12 at 22:43
    
+1, nice answer –  jxh Jun 16 '12 at 0:25

If you define your ADL functions with an extra argument, it gives it a different type signature, so you won't have a conflict. I defined the template in global scope, but it will work in the ns scope as well.

namespace ns
{
   class A {};
   class B {};
   void foo(A, int) { std::cout << "adl: fooA" << std::endl; }
   void foo(B, int) { std::cout << "adl: fooB" << std::endl; }
}

template <typename T>
void foo(T t) {
   foo(t, 0);
}

int main()
{
   ns::A a;
   ns::B b;
   foo(a);    //calls ns::foo
   foo(b);    //calls ns::foo
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's true, but unfortunately I'm in a situation where I don't have control over the signature of the function of interest. –  Jared Hoberock Jun 15 '12 at 23:39
    
@JaredHoberock: Can you add the argument to the template function instead? Or are you trying to intercept existing calls and do something extra? –  jxh Jun 15 '12 at 23:42
    
Yes, I could decorate ns::foo in some manner, perhaps with an enable_if, or some other decorator around its parameter. –  Jared Hoberock Jun 15 '12 at 23:44
    
@JaredHoberock: I agree rodrigo's answer is better. +1 on your question from me too. –  jxh Jun 16 '12 at 0:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.