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I am trying to figure out what is going on. Here is our setup: We have four SQL servers that are in replication with each other.

We add a new user to Windows Active Directory and add them to a group that is in SQL Server that we have been using for ages.

The new user, when trying to authenticate using Windows authenication returns that error in the subject line. But, any users that were previously in Active directory work fine.

At one point I had gotten SQL Server "caught up" becauuse we had a group of users that could not log in because of this error. I did some changes to the SPNs and ended up making it so no one could log in. Then I realized how the SPNs were supposed to look and fixed it. Then I guess some magic happened and those users were able to authenticate. I thought it was fixed, but it is obviously not as we had to add one new user and they cannot authenticate.

What is interesting is that the user can authenticate with three out of the four SQL Servers. It is only this one server that is working incorrectly. I set up two SPNs for the SQl Service on this sql server.

They look like -

MSSQLSvc/[servername].[domain].local:1433

MSSQLSvc/[servername]:1433

These are actually registered to the Service account that we use for the SQL Servers. What is interesting is that I can't find the SPNs for the servers that are working anywhere.

Any help would be appreciated!

Edit: Also, another point to note is that if I try to add the user directly as a login into SQL server. I right click Logins and click Add Login then click search. I then type in [Domain]\[Username] and click check names. It validates the name as being correct. Then I click OK. And then OK again, and it gives the Error Windows NT user or group '[Domain]\[Username]' not found. Check the name Again.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I thought it was fixed, but it is obviously not as we had to add one new user and they cannot authenticate.

The user has to relogin in order to pick up the new group. Otherwise, it's kerberos ticket is still using the old group membership information in its PAC

These are actually registered to the Service account that we use for the SQL Servers. What is interesting is that I can't find the SPNs for the servers that are working anywhere.

I think what happen is that you have one SQL Server with SPN setup properly while the other three SQL Servers with no SPN setup at all. So, you are going to use Kerberos on this particular server while NTLM on the other three.

As mentioned before, when you are using Kerberos, you have to either purge the ticket using some tools or you have to relogin in order to pick up the new group membership. You can also try to lock the screen and then unlock it. If I remember correctly, this should also refresh the ticket.

Unlike Kerberos, NTLM doesn't carry the group memberhsip data. After SQL Server authenticated the user using NTLM, it will find the authenticated user's group membership, including the new group you just added.

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While this wasn't exactly the answer it did lead me into the right direction. It pointed me at the fact that it was trying to use a different way to authenticate. So all I needed to do was in active directory I Allowed this sql server to be trusted for delegation for kerberos. I was able to add a new user, log in as them, and authenticate with SQL Server immediately. Thanks! – bigphildogg86 Jun 18 '12 at 18:52
    
Thanks for accepting my answer. Just want to clarify one thing. Granting SQL Server to be trusted for delegation for kerberos means you allows SQL server to impersonate the end user and SQL server is allowed use the impersonated token to talk to another server on the network. Perhaps, I still don't quite understand your situation. You don't need to grant this to SQL Server normally. Usually, this is required on web server because web server needs to impersonate the end user and use the end user identity to contact the SQL Server. – Harvey Kwok Jun 18 '12 at 21:58
    
Oh...Hm, interesting then. Not sure what was going on. But yeah from your original answer I had added the user THEN logged in as them and it still wasn't working. It was the fact that it seemed that this SQL Server wasn't getting an update list of users. In the event log it was curious though because the username would be blank when it failed. Like it didn't even recognize who I was trying to add. The only thing I can think is that this server is in the domain but somehow it is corrupt in the setup? – bigphildogg86 Jun 18 '12 at 22:05
    
One thing that come to my mind is that you may have a domain with multiple domain controllers. The group membership information is not replicated to another domain controller yet. So, even you relogin, it still cannot pick up the new group information. However, from what you are saying, it does sound like time sensitive. I believe it's not related to the "delegation for kerberos" settings. It's just after you spent couple hours touching this settings and that settings, the group membership finally got replicated. – Harvey Kwok Jun 18 '12 at 22:19
    
I believe we do have two domain controllers. But I would think our SQL Server would be using the primary not the secondary like all the other SQL Servers must be using. – bigphildogg86 Jun 19 '12 at 1:49

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