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I used the following create statement:

CREATE TABLE `subscr` (
 `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `media_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
 `user_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
 `date` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 UNIQUE KEY (`media_id`, `user_id`),
 CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (`media_id`) REFERENCES `media` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (`user_id`) REFERENCES `users` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB

Why does InnoDB only put an index on user_id? I thought it needed indexes on all foreign key references.

CREATE TABLE `subscr` (
 `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `media_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
 `user_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
 `date` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 UNIQUE KEY `media_id` (`media_id`,`user_id`),
 KEY `user_id` (`user_id`),
 CONSTRAINT `subscriptions_media_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`media_id`) REFERENCES `media` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
 CONSTRAINT `subscriptions_media_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`user_id`) REFERENCES `users` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

media_id has an index, too, and it's unique. It's sufficient the way it is for MySQL. There's just a separate index created for user_id, since user_id in the unique index is second, and therefore it's useless for the foreign key.

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