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(note: this is related to Usage preference between a struct and a class in D language but for a more specific use case)

When writing a D interface to, say, C++ code, SWIG and others do something like this:

class A{
   private _A*ptr;//defined as extern(C) elsewhere
   this(){ptr=_A_new();}//ditto 
   this(string s){ptr=_A_new(s);} //ditto
   ~this(){_A_delete(ptr);} //ditto
   void fun(){_A_fun(ptr);}
}

Let's assume no inheritance is needed.

My question is: wouldn't it be preferable to use a struct instead of a class for this?

The pros being:

1) efficiency (stack allocation)

2) ease-of-use (no need to write new everywhere, eg: auto a=A(B(1),C(2)) vs auto a=new A(new B(1),new C(2)) )?

The cons being: require additional field is_own to handle aliasing via postblit.

What would be the best way to do so? Is there anything else to worry about? Here's an attempt:

struct A{
   private _A*ptr;
   bool is_own;//required for postblit
   static A opCall(){//cannot write this() for struct
       A a;
       a.ptr=_A_new();
       a.is_own=true;
       return a;
   }
   this(string s){ptr=_A_new(s); is_own=true;} 
   ~this(){if(is_own) _A_delete(ptr);}
   void fun(){_A_fun(ptr);}
   this(this){//postblit; 
       //shallow copy: I don't want to call the C++ copy constructor (expensive or unknown semantics)           
       is_own=false; //to avoid _A_delete(ptr)
   }
}

Note the postblit is necessary for cases when calling functions such as:

myfun(A a){}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suggest that you read this page. The only functions on C++ classes that you can call in D are virtual functions. That means that

D can­not call C++ spe­cial mem­ber func­tions, and vice versa. These in­clude con­struc­tors, de­struc­tors, con­ver­sion op­er­a­tors, op­er­a­tor over­load­ing, and al­lo­ca­tors.

And when you declare a C++ class in D, you use an extern(C++) interface. So, your class/struct would look like this

extern(C++) interface A
{
   void fun();
}

However, you'd need another extern(C++) function to allocate any objects of type A, since it's C++ code that has to do that as the D code doesn't have access to any of the constructors. You'd also need a way to pass it back to C++ code to be deleted when you're done with it.

Now, if you want to wrap that interface in a type which is going to call the extern(C++) function to construct it and the extern(C++) function to delete it (so that you don't have to worry about doing that manually), then whether you use a class or struct depends entirely on what you're trying to do with it.

A class would be a reference type, which mirrors what the C++ class actually is. So, passing it around would work without you having to do anything special. But if you wanted a guarantee that the wrapped C++ object was freed, you'd have to do so manually, because there's no guarantee that the D class' finalizer would ever be run (and presumably, that's where you'd put the code for calling the C++ function to delete the C++ object). You'd have to either use clear (which will actually be renamed to destroy in the next release of the compiler - dmd 2.060) to destroy the D object (i.e. call its finalizer and handle the destruction of any of its member variables which are value types), or you'd have to call a function on the D object which called the C++ function to delete the C++ object. e.g.

extern(C++) interface A
{
   void fun();
}

extern(C++) A createA();
extern(C++) void deleteA(A a);

class Wrapper
{
public:
    this()
    {
        _a = createA();
    }

    ~this()
    {
        deleteA(_a);
    }

    auto opDispatch(string name, Args...)(Args args)
    {
        return mixin("_a." ~ name ~ "(args)");
    }

private:

    A _a;
}

void main()
{
    auto wrapped = new Wrapper();

    //do stuff...

    //current
    clear(wrapped);

    //starting with dmd 2.060
    //destroy(wrapped);
}

But that does have the downside that if you don't call clear/destroy, and the garbage collector never collects your wrapper object, deleteA will never be called on the C++ object. That may or may not matter. It depends on whether the C++ object really needs its destructor to be called before the program terminates or whether it can just let its memory return to the OS (without its destructor being called) when the program terminates if the GC never needs to collect the wrapper object.

If you want deterministic destruction, then you need a struct. That means that you'll need to worry about making the struct into a reference type. Otherwise, if it gets copied, when one of them is destroyed, the C++ object will be deleted, and the other struct will point to garbage (which it will then try and delete when it gets destroyed). To solve that, you could use std.typecons.RefCounted. Then you get something like

extern(C++) interface A
{
   void fun();
}

extern(C++) A createA();
extern(C++) void deleteA(A a);

struct Wrapper
{
public:
    static Wrapper opCall()
    {
        Wrapper retval;
        retval._a = createA();
        return retval;
    }

    ~this()
    {
        if(_a !is null)
        {
            deleteA(_a);
            _a = null;
        }
    }

    auto opDispatch(string name, Args...)(Args args)
    {
        return mixin("_a." ~ name ~ "(args)");
    }

private:

    A _a;
}


void main()
{
    auto wrapped = RefCounted!Wrapper();
    //do stuff...
}

You could also define the wrapper so that it has the ref-counting logic in it and avoid RefCounted, but that would definitely be more complicated.

Regardless, I would definitely advise against your suggestion of using a bool to mark whether the wrapper owns the C++ object or not, because if the original wrapper object gets destroyed before all of the copies do, then your copies will point to garbage.

Another option if you did want the C++ object's copy constructor to be used (and therefore treat the C++ object as a value type) would be to add an extern(C++) function which took the C++ object and returned a copy of it and then use it in a postblit.

extern(C++) A copyA(A a);

this(this)
{
    if(_a !is null)
        _a = copyA(a);
}

Hopefully that makes things clear enough.

share|improve this answer
    
For deterministic destruction you can also use std.typecons.scoped with a class object, which is a library alternative for the to-be-deprecated scoped statement. Scoped means the class' destructor is called on the exit of the scope the class object was created in. Btw, using interfaces like this is one way of writing wrappers, but there are other ways. You could expose C functions and implement cross-language polymorphism without many restrictions, and you could collect all C++ objects into e.g. some global hash which is released upon app exit and C++ destructors would be called. –  Andrej M. Jun 16 '12 at 22:27
    
Thanks for the detailed answer, that was helpful! –  timotheecour Jul 7 '12 at 20:29

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