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Say I have a type with a member function:

class Thing {
    std::string m_name;
public:
    std::string & getName() {
        return m_name;
    }
};

And say I have a collection of that type:

std::vector<Thing> things;

And I want to keep the things in order by name. To do that, I use std::lower_bound to figure out where to put it:

bool thingLessThan(Thing const& thing, std::string const& name) {
    return thing.getName() < name;
}

void addThing(std::string const& name) {
    vector<Thing>::iterator position = lower_bound(
        things.begin(), things.end(),
        name,
       thingLessThan);
    if (position == things.end() || position->getName() != name) {
        position = things.insert(position, Thing());
        position->getName() = name;
    }
}

Is there a way to do the same thing as the thingLessThan function without actually creating a function, perhaps using std::mem_fun, std::less, etc?

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You could use a lambda. It's inlined right into the function call. You could also use a container that automatically orders its elements, but you'll need to define operator< for it to work. –  chris Jun 15 '12 at 23:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Other than a lambda you can simply define an operator< which adheres to strict weak ordering to allow a container of your object to be comparable by STL algorithms with the default predicate std::less

class whatever
{
public:
   bool operator<(const whatever& rhs) const { return x < rhs.x; }

private:
   int x;
};

std::vector<whatever> v;
std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());
share|improve this answer
    
I suppose this is the best we can do prior to C++11. I can't wait until g++ is officially 100% C++11 compatible. I'm really hurting for some move semantics and lambdas. –  Travis Parks Jun 16 '12 at 3:55
    
@TravisParks You don't need g++ to support 100% of C++11. It doesn't even support all of C++-98. But it already supports both move semantics and lambdas. So whatever is holding you back, it's not G++. :) –  jalf Jun 17 '12 at 12:29
    
I just don't want to specify anything in the command line. I'll wait until everything is turned on by default. –  Travis Parks Jun 17 '12 at 16:43

Sure. You can use a lambda expression (assuming your compiler supports it):

vector<Thing>::iterator position = lower_bound(
    things.begin(), things.end(),
    name,
   [](Thing const& thing, std::string const& name) { return thing.getName() < name; });

Of course, an alternative option is just to define operator< for the class, then it will be used by default, if you don't specify another comparer function for std::lower_bound.

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Depending on what your purpose is? If you just like the syntactic niceness of not declaring something to be used in one place, use lambda expressions to create an anonymous function.

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You can overload operator<() and use std::less<T> if you don't want to write predicates contantly. Also you can use lambda-expressions, which would be much nicer, because operator<() is logically connected only with things, that can be put in some order in obvious ways, like numbers or strings.

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If you use a std::map, the strings will be placed in alphabetical order automatically. If you want to modify the ordering further, create your own key comparison function. I think this would be the simplest option.

To use a std::list, you can write your own comparison code inside of the addThing() function that goes through the list looking at each string and inserts the new one at the appropriate place.

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