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I want to divide a number of type double, by an int. I only need the result in 2 deicmal place in string format. What is the best way to do this in terms of stack efficiency?

double d=321321321313131233213213213213;
int i=123;

ToString(d/i); //what do I get when I do this? A double? A float?

       public String ToString(float? result) //what should I cast the result?
        {
            return @String.Format("{0:#,0.##;} divided double by int", result);
        }
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1  
and `@~ in front of a function name does nothing in C#. It should throw a compiler error. –  Cole Johnson Jun 16 '12 at 0:21
    
Please leave off the "C#" in front of your titles. Please see "Stack Overflow is not in need of your SEO skills". –  John Saunders Jun 16 '12 at 0:29
1  
@Cole, that is untrue. It is unnecessary here. But it is legal. (to be clear, @ allows you to use -- as identifiers -- what would otherwise be a reserved word. Method names are identifiers) –  Kirk Woll Jun 16 '12 at 1:32
    
yes , well spotted. totally unnecessary, even thought legal. code port from razor mistake. –  River Jun 18 '12 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

ToString(d/i); //what do I get when I do this? A double? A float?

You'll get a double. Dividing a double by an int will result in a double value.

public String ToString(float? result) //what should I cast the result?

You'll get a double for the value, so you'd be better off just using a double here. You'll never get a nullable type, and definitely wouldn't get a float as a result, so using float? is wholly inappropriate.

What is the best way to do this in terms of stack efficiency?

This is really not worth worrying about, unless, of course, you profile and find this really happens to be a problem. Building the string will be far more expensive than the division operation, and neither is likely to be a hotspot in terms of performance.


A clean way to handle this would just be to use double.ToString("N2"), ie:

double result = d/i;
string resultAsString = result.ToString("N2");

If you want a full, formatted string, you can use:

string resultAsString = string.Format("{0:N2} divided double by int", result);
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Ok. First off, you get double, not double? or float?. Math functions should never return a nullable type. If you are assuming that infinity is represented as null, you are wrong. Infinities are determined by the bits. You can see if a double is infinity with Double.IsInfinity(double).

[SecuritySafeCritical]
public static unsafe bool IsInfinity(double d)
{
    return ((*(((long*) &d)) & 0x7fffffffffffffffL) == 0x7ff0000000000000L);
}

What is the best way to do this in terms of stack efficiency?

I would recommend a look at the tragedies of micro optimization over at Coding Horror.


As for the function. That is completely unnecessary. Your best bet is Double.ToString(...):

double val = d / i;
string result = val.ToString("N2");

However, if you are using String.Format(...), you can use:

double val = d / i;
string result = string.Format("{0:N2} divided double by int", val);
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Just FYI - The cast isn't necessary - Int32 will automatically widen to Double in this case. –  Reed Copsey Jun 16 '12 at 0:27
    
@ReedCopsey hmm. When I did float * int, I got 0 on my app until I cast. –  Cole Johnson Jun 16 '12 at 0:28
    
Cole: C# language spec, "7.3.6.2 Binary numeric promotions" handles this - "if either operand is of type double, the other operand is converted to type double." (decimal first, then double, then float) –  Reed Copsey Jun 16 '12 at 0:35
    
A cast should only be required if you're trying to do decimal*double or decimal*float or working with ulong & "smaller" integer types. –  Reed Copsey Jun 16 '12 at 0:36

Hacky solution:

If you need only 2 decimal places, you can multiply your double by 100, convert it to an integer, and then divide it by i.

Now take the string of the result, and add a dot before the last two chars.

Don't forget to handle the edge cases of negative values and rounding problems.

If you really care about efficiency, division of fractions is a slow process in comparison to division of integers.

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how about bit shifts? –  River Jun 18 '12 at 19:44

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