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I'm trying to declare an object from a class in another file. I have added the #include "transfer.h" into my metadata.cpp file, but I'm getting the following error:

 metadata.o: In function `importMetadata':
 metadata.cpp:(.text+0x81): undefined reference to A::B::C::Transfer::Transfer()'
metadata.cpp:(.text+0x81): undefined reference to A::B::C::Transfer::~Transfer()'

And Transfer is defined with in transfer.h

namespace A{
  namespace B{
    namespace C{
       class Transfer {
            public:
               Transfer();
               ~Transfer();
               int copydata();
            ... more code goes here.
        };
    }
   }
}

The file transfer.cpp looks like this:

Transfer::Transfer(){
}
Transfer::~Transfer(){
}

I'm also doing an using namespace A::B::C; on the header of the metadata.cpp file. Could someone please help me on that? In the function int importMetadata() in metadata.cpp I'm declaring Transfer transfer; so in metadata.cpp I'm doing 'transfer.copydata();`

share|improve this question
1  
Please show us a complete example that reproduces your error. –  robert Jun 16 '12 at 1:11
3  
There is rarely a case to need so many nested namespaces and practically never a case to have a using namespace ... –  AJG85 Jun 16 '12 at 1:11
    
Does Transfer have a default constructor defined? The error is simply telling you that the linker couldn't find the implementation of Transfer(). –  Evan Teran Jun 16 '12 at 1:11
    
I know that's the way to go. –  philippe Jun 16 '12 at 1:12
1  
Chances are you declared one, but didn't define it, or the linker is having trouble finding the definition. –  chris Jun 16 '12 at 1:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hopefully you left out part of your transfer.cpp file, but in case you didnt it should define the namespace to match your header file like such:

namespace A{
  namespace B{
    namespace C{
        Transfer::Transfer(){
        }
        Transfer::~Transfer(){
        }
    }
  }
}

In case you have fully defined the namespaces, either inline or as above, you'll want to make sure you have the transfer.cpp file included in your project. Seems like the linker is unable to find your source file.

share|improve this answer
    
If he hadn't defined the namespaces correctly, this would yield a compiler error rather than a linker error I think. –  Fraser Jun 16 '12 at 2:56
    
@Fraser: I thought about that too, but the compiler will compile two classes of the same name in different namespaces. –  MrWuf Jun 16 '12 at 19:54

Since you have linker error and not a compiler error this tells you that your #include statement is doing what you want and the compiler recognizes the Transfer class and its constructor. The error occurs when the linker tries to find a reference to the implementation of the Transfer::Transfer() function in one of the .o or .lib files its told to link but cannot find it.

It's likely you have a transfer.cpp to go along with the transfer.h and this file is missing the implementation of the Transfer constructor and destructor. This could be because the functions are missing altogether or have been accidentally defined with a different signature.

So transfer.cpp should look something like:

A::B::C::Transfer::Transfer()
{
}

A::B::C::Transfer::~Transfer() 
{
}

Another possibility is that you are trying to link the implementaiton of transfer from a library. In this case you would need to tell your linker to use the .lib file as input. The syntax for this will depend on the compiler you are using.

share|improve this answer
    
If the functions were accidentally defined with a different signature, this would yield a compiler error rather than a linker error wouldn't it? +1 for suggesting the missing library though. Another option is that transfer.cpp exists, but isn't being compiled into the target. –  Fraser Jun 16 '12 at 1:50
    
@Fraser is right, if you had defined something like Transfer(int) then the compilation of transfer.cpp would err saying it was not defined. I thought it a useful suggestion since we don't know what's inside "...more code goes here" as well as whether all error output is limited to what was presented in the question or not. –  kennbrodhagen Jun 16 '12 at 2:34

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