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Love the site--it has been very informative throughout my studies. Just finished a quarter of C# intro and one of the projects was to design a Financial "Account Manager" app that keeps a balance and updates it when withdraws and deposits are made. The project was fairly simple and I didn't have any problems. Unfortunately, my next quarter doesn't include any programming classes :(, so I'm using the time to expand my knowledge through beefing up my Account Manager app.

First thing I wanted to do, was to enable multiple users. So far, I've included a CreateNewUser class that prohibits duplicate user names, checks new passwords for specific formatting requirements, salts and hashes it, and saves it to an "Accounts" table with the username (email address) and an auto-incremented user id. Simple enough.

So now I'm stuck: not sure what would be best practice. I don't think that the user should be using the same table as other users, so I'm thinking that each user should have their own table. Am I being "too paranoid", or is my thinking along the lines of common programming security practices? The truth is that nobody will probably ever use this app, but I'm trying to learn what I can apply in the real world when I grow up.

Using the same table only requires loading the DataSet with a query of matching userID's, so that wouldn't be a big deal. If I should use separate tables, then I would need to create a new table dynamically when the new user is created, and I was going to just name the table with the user id, which would simulate the account number in the real world, I'm assuming.

Anyway, I couldn't find another question that covered this, so I thought I'd ask ya'll for your thoughts.

Thanks,

Deadeddie

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Think of it this way. If you're going to be keeping physical examples of these tables, for example, using a notebook. Would you rather have a lot of small notebooks or one big notebook that you can refer too? –  JKM Jun 16 '12 at 2:01
    
It seems like the big notebook option would be my preference, and easier to implement, I just wanted to know if I was missing something on the security side. –  deadEddie Jun 16 '12 at 3:29
    
As long as your code is written to only pull the correct data (in this case, matching userIDs) there isn't a big deal security wise because all your code will be handling the access permissions to the data. –  JKM Jun 16 '12 at 4:48

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Think of it this way. If you're going to be keeping physical examples of these tables, for example, using a notebook. Would you rather have a lot of small notebooks or one big notebook that you can refer too?

As long as your code is written to only pull the correct data (in this case, matching userIDs) there isn't a big deal security wise because all your code will be handling the access permissions to the data. And your database and code have the correct permissions set on them as well.

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So far, I've included a CreateNewUser class that prohibits duplicate user names, checks new passwords for specific formatting requirements, salts and hashes it, and saves it to an "Accounts" table with the username (email address) and an auto-incremented user id. Simple enough.

Already bad. It should be a Users table - Account in an application dealing with financial information has a very specific financial meaning, and you may want to have multiple accounts per user and / or an account shared by users.

Also, unless you write Powershell CmdLets (where one class per command is the pattern), a CreateNewUser class is as bad as going out an d burning cars. User is a class, some sort of repository is ok, but CREATE NEW is if anything a FUNCTION on the class. It is definitely not a complete class - you totally botch the concept of object orientation if you turn every method in a class.

I don't think that the user should be using the same table as other users,

Again a total beginenr mistake. Why not? Put in proper fields referencing the account and / or user as appropriate and be fine.

then I would need to create a new table dynamically when the new user is created,

Did you ever think what you are doing here? Maintenance wise every change means writing a program that finds out what user tables exist, then modifies them. Tooling support out of the window. I once saw an application written like that - invoice management. It had one invoice details tables PER INVOICE (and an invoice table per invoice, coded by invoice number) because the programmer never understood what databases are.

Am I being "too paranoid", or is my thinking along the lines of common programming security practices?

They are along the line "you are fired, learn how databases work".

Using the same table only requires loading the DataSet with a query of matching userID's

;) So DataSet are still around? Is there a reason you do programming archaeology, following the worst practices of the last 30 years at Microsoft - instead of using an ORM as Microsoft already provides since some time now (Linq2SQL, Entity Framework) which would make your application a lot - ah - more - ah - object oriented?

May I suggest reading a decent book? Look up "Building Object Applications That Work" by Scott Ambler? And no, it is not written for C# - interesting enough the concepts of good architecture are 99% language agnostic.

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Thanks everyone. A little semantics. The "Accounts" table is a table of accounts (User ID, E-mail address, and salted / hashed password), but "Users" would be more descriptive -- thanks. And thanks everyone else for sharing some of your experience. That's what I was looking for. I'm good. –  deadEddie Jun 16 '12 at 19:03

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