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I have an object and an array:

m = { "1": ["2", "3"], "6": ["4", "5"] };
var p = ["1", "6"];

I have a for loop:

for (var i = 0; i < p.length; i++) {
    // Return an array that is the value of a key in m, for each key specified in p
    var array = m[p[i]]; 

    // do stuff with array
}

Any reason why the above does not work? array is still undefined after the for loop runs.

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m = { "1": ["2", "3"], "6", ["4", "5"] }; this is invalid json, you have "6", ["4", "5"] without a keys. maybe you mean this m = [{ "1":["2", "3"]}, "6", ["4", "5"]]; –  Samy Vilar Jun 16 '12 at 3:12
    
@samy.vilar: No one said it was JSON, but you're right about the "6". The object syntax is invalid. I'm guessing it's a typo in the question. –  squint Jun 16 '12 at 3:19
    
@amnotiam JSON stands for Javascript Object Notation, what is he doing? declaring an object. (I think, I have no idea actually since its wrong) –  Samy Vilar Jun 16 '12 at 3:21
    
@samy.vilar: He's using object literal notation to create a JavaScript object. This is not the same as JSON. If JSON is embedded in JavaScript code, it must be done as a string, since JSON is textual data. –  squint Jun 16 '12 at 3:23
    
@amnotiam this is invalid json I should have just stuck out and said this is invalid JS. –  Samy Vilar Jun 16 '12 at 3:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your declaration of m = { "1": ["2", "3"], "6", ["4", "5"] }; gives syntax error for me. I assume you mean m = { "1": ["2", "3"], "6": ["4", "5"] };.

p.length is 2, so you have 2 iterations of the loop. In first iteration values of your expressions are:

i = 0
p[i] = "1"
m[p[i]] = m["1"] = ["2", "3"]

In second loop:

i = 1
p[i] = "2"
m[p[i]] = m["2"] (undefined)

You have only m["1"] and m["6"], no m["2"]. That's why array is undefined in the last iteration. So it remains undefined after the loop.

You may correct m declaration as following:

m = { "1": ["2", "3"], "2": ["4", "5"] };

Now you will get array = ["4", "5"] after the loop.

I can advise you not to store integers in strings. Use 2 instead of "2". Otherwise it can cause errors in the future. For example, 2 + 2 = 4 and "2" + "2" = "22". If you have "2" from some other code, use parseInt to convert it to a normal number.

Also, you don't have to create p variable with list of keys. You can simply use for..in loop to iterate through keys of your object:

m = { 1: [2, 3], 2: [4, 5] };
for(i in m) {
  var array = m[i];
  //do stuff
}

Keep in mind that for..in doesn't guarantee to preserve the order of keys. However, all existing implementations of for..in do preserve the order.

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Thank you, especially for the tip about for (i in m). The reason the keys are integers are because I'm using them as ids, and the ids won't necessarily be integers. I probably should have used something like a and b for the keys in the example. –  chrishenn Jun 16 '12 at 3:26
    
Keep in mind that for-in doesn't guarantee an order. If you need to enforce a specific order, the Array technique used in the question should be used. –  squint Jun 16 '12 at 3:30
    
Using integer as an object key is OK. I was speaking about ["2", "3"], it should be [2, 3]. –  Pavel Strakhov Jun 16 '12 at 3:31

Also I think p should be [1,6] as well? Since you're using it to reference the keys in the object m.

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+1, the error is that the loop ends with array = m["2"], which is undefined, since m has no key 2. –  apsillers Jun 16 '12 at 3:21

The error happens because you have this declaration:

var p = ["1","2"];

But the m properties are:

m = {
    "1": [2,3],
    "6": [4,5]
}

So in p[1] makes your program read m["2"] but it doesn't have a "2" property. Use this code instead:

var p = ["1","6"];
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Probably wouldn't put quotes around the properties of the object, either. –  Sethen Maleno Jun 16 '12 at 3:10
1  
@MarkLinus: All object properties are strings, including Array properties. –  squint Jun 16 '12 at 3:14
    
@MarkLinus Sometimes putting quotes around properties of objects can have unwanted side effects, hence, you probably shouldn't if you don't have to. –  Sethen Maleno Jun 16 '12 at 3:19
    
@SethenMaleno: Can you provide an example of that? –  squint Jun 16 '12 at 3:20
    
@amnotiam you are right. The script is not crashing because of what I said. It was and error on the p var –  Danilo Valente Jun 16 '12 at 3:21

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