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Suppose I have a designated initializer that does some initialization as such:

- (id)initWithBlah:(NSString *)arg1 otherBlah:(NSArray *)arg2
{ 
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        ...
    }
    return self;
}

and I have another initializer that needs to call this, but then perform some other setup task:

- (id)initWithSomeOtherBlah:(void *)creativeArg
{
    // Is this right? It seems to compile and run as expected, but feels wrong
    self = [self initWithBlah:nil otherBlah:nil];
    if (self)
    {
        [self someProcessingForThisInitDependentOnSelfInit:creativeArg];
    }

    return self;
}

Since the test to make sure the return value is correct, should 'self' be used in this context? I'm wondering if this is even a valid combination of events. We have a situation where we have an initializer that needs to perform some additional setup after the designated initializer is ran.

I'm wondering if the correct approach is to shove this additional processing in the designated initializer..

Please let me know if more clarification is needed. I was trying to keep this simple. :)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You seem to feel 'wrong' about referencing self inside the initializer (under the assumption that, until you return self at the end, self is not fully initialized yet?). I presume that once NSObject's init has run, you should be able to call [self anyMethod] (unless anyMethod uses some ivar you haven't initialized yet). Hope this clarifies something... –  NicolasMiari Jun 16 '12 at 7:44
    
Referencing self isn't as disconcerting as reassigning it. I guess it's okay, since it really is just an invisible argument that's initially set to the class instance. The more I think about it, the more I realize that understanding that allows this to work. So, technically, initWithBlah:otherBlah: could potentially modify the pointer, which is okay, and the reassignment is also valid. I'm thinking this is more about how to deal with two initializers that are "weighted" equally.. I like the answers below. Gonna re-read them. –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 0:58

3 Answers 3

A general rule of thumb that I follow is that the designated initializer is the initializer with the most parameters and the other initializers chain down to the designated initializer.

In your example you are not using creativeArg in your initWithSomeOtherBlah constructor. I am not sure if that was intentional or not.

With this approach you are being explicit with your intentions when creating an object instead of side effect programming.

For example:

@implementation BlaClass

- (id)initWithBlah:(NSString *)arg1 otherBlah:(NSArray *)arg2 creativeArg:(void *)arg3
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        self.arg1 = arg1;
        self.arg2 = arg2;
        self.arg3 = arg3;
        [self someProcessingForThisInitDependentOnSelfInit:arg3];
    }
    return self;
}


- (void)someProcessingForThisInitDependentOnSelfInit:(void *)creativeArg
{
    if(creativeArg == NULL) return; 


    //do creative stuff 
}

- (id)initWithSomeOtherBlah:(void *)arg
{
    return [self initWithBlah:nil otherBlah:nil creativeArg:arg];
}

 ...
 @end
share|improve this answer
    
It was an oversight, but didn't mean to overlook the use of creativeArg. The key thing about the solution I'm tossing around is that "someProcessingForThisInitDependentOnSelfInit:" would only be called when the second variation of the initializer is used. And then assume there are other initializers that shouldn't call it. I actually see your solution clearer now, and it depends on creativeArg being assigned a non-nil value. This probably might not work is nil would be a valid value for creativeArg though, but it does help me think about the problem differently. –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 1:02
    
Glad that the example helped. Happy Coding! –  Shane Panter Jun 18 '12 at 1:20
    
I updated the example to check for NULL not nil because creativeArg is a void* not an id –  Shane Panter Jun 18 '12 at 1:22

If you need two initializers in your class which initialize the class somewhat differently, a good coding practice is to identify the setup tasks that both initializers need to perform them, and move them to a separate method. This way, you don't need to call one custom initializer inside another. Here is how you need to do it:

-(void) setupBlah
{.....}

- (id)initWithBlah:(NSString *)arg1 otherBlah:(NSArray *)arg2
{ 
    if (self =[super init])
      {
        [self setupBlah];
        //Do other initialization
            ....
       }
   return self;
}

- (id)initWithSomeOtherBlah:(void *)creativeArg
{


    if (self = [super init])
    {
        [self setupBlah];
        //Do other initialization
          .....
    }

    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, I would implement the contents of 'setupBlah' in [self init] (no parameters) and have [self init] be the designated initializer (calls super) –  NicolasMiari Jun 16 '12 at 7:47
    
This is interesting, and it follows my experience in some other languages. But, then having just init (with no args) be the designated initializer sort of violates the recommended pattern where the initializer with the most arguments is the 'designated' one. I guess it's still acceptable. –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 0:51
    
Also, should [super init] be called in each initializer, or just the designated one? –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 1:19
    
So with this example I see duplicated code. Additionally, neither example passes the constructor args to setupBlah. How does setupBlah set anything up without the arguments? If your are going to throw the arguments away then what are they used for? The point of a constructor is to setup the internal state of your object and with the example above it is not clear how the internal state is being setup. –  Shane Panter Jun 18 '12 at 1:24
    
Sorry one last item, this example appears to be broken for subclassing. How is a subclass suppose to know which constructor to call? If you subclass this example and call the wrong initializer then what state is your object in? What happens when this is the base class? How do you ensure that everything is good completely ready? –  Shane Panter Jun 18 '12 at 1:40

There is nothing wrong with calling another initializer from a non-designated initializer, see Apple's docs here.

In the case that I have two or more designated initializers (such as a view with initWithFrame: and initWithCoder:), I have found myself to define a setUp method that I call from both initializers, which is just a shorter name for your someProcessingForThisInitDependentOnSelfInit method.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a pretty clear example, and it sortof highlights something I overlooked: that the designated initializer is (typically) the only initializer that calls the superclass initializer and checks the return value (assigning to 'self'). So in my case, assigning self the result of another initializer (on my class) isn't hurting anything, but typically not done, since I would know if I was changing the return pointer in my other initializer. –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 1:08
    
After looking at this closer, I think it's important to point that Apple's docs doesn't factor in this situation. For instance, taking their secondary initializer and splitting it apart: if I wanted to do some other minor state change or calls after calling the designated initializer, but before returning 'id', I should still check the return value from the call to the designated, which my original pattern accounts for. Technically, it's possible for the [super init] to return 'nil', and if reassigning self isn't done in secondary initializer, it masks the correct result. Hmmm. –  CleverCoder Jun 18 '12 at 1:15
1  
@CleverCoder, maybe the apple docs don't factor in this situation because your object is trying to do to much. For example say you have a cat-mouse object that is REALLY a cat-mouse object with constructor 1 but if you call constructor 2 then you get just a cat object. –  Shane Panter Jun 18 '12 at 1:45

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