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How do you unit test code decorated with the PrincipalPermission attribute?

For example, this works:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetPrincipalPolicy(PrincipalPolicy.WindowsPrincipal);
        var c = new MyClass();
    }
}

[PrincipalPermission(SecurityAction.Demand, Role = @"BUILTIN\Users")]
class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This works.");
    }
}

This throws a SecurityException:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    [TestInitialize]
    public void TestInitialize()
    {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetPrincipalPolicy(PrincipalPolicy.WindowsPrincipal);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1() 
    { 
        var c = new MyClass();
    }
}

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Interesting... I ran the same test with TestDriven and it passed. In this case, the test appeared to run as me, but when the test was run with mstest the CurrentPrincipal had a 'blank' identity. Does anyone know why? – Mark Good Jul 9 '09 at 20:58
up vote 16 down vote accepted

How about creating a GenericIdentity and attaching that to the Thread.CurrentPrincipal in your test like so:

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1() 
{ 
    var identity = new GenericIdentity("tester");
    var roles = new[] { @"BUILTIN\Users" };
    var principal = new GenericPrincipal(identity, roles);
    Thread.CurrentPrincipal = principal;

    var c = new MyClass();
}

For a fail test, you could:

[TestMethod]
[ExpectedException(typeof(SecurityException))] // Or whatever it's called in MsTest
public void TestMethod1() 
{ 
    var identity = new GenericIdentity("tester");
    var roles = new[] { @"BUILTIN\NotUsers" };
    var principal = new GenericPrincipal(identity, roles);
    Thread.CurrentPrincipal = principal;

    var c = new MyClass();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked, Ray, Thanks! But it seemed too easy to fake. Couldn't anyone claim to have the require role? – Mark Good Jul 10 '09 at 12:51
    
Cool! Glad to help! It is just that easy in a full trust setting. Setting Thread.CurrentPrincipal requres special privleges, specifically, you need SecurityPermission of SecurityPermissionFlag.ControlPrincipal. See Keith Brown's book online: alt.pluralsight.com/wiki/default.aspx/Keith.GuideBook/… – Ray Vernagus Jul 10 '09 at 13:14
    
Very interesting article! But I have no way of knowing or controlling whether or not my users have the security permission to change CurrentPrincipal. Luckily, my application is a WCF service which I am guessing (and hoping), like the timer and thead pool, won't propagate the CurrentPrincipal. – Mark Good Jul 10 '09 at 13:44
    
Just to add: In MsTest, you can add the roles to the principal, but if you don't give the identity a valid name then it will think it's not authenticated. Caught me for about an hour, that one. – Mel Padden Mar 8 '13 at 15:40

You could try impersonating different users within the test method, if you run the code as an admin you could create a local user account inside the test (or test class) and delete it at the end.

Edit: Sorry, I imagined using impersonate to test a failure case - I should have read your question properly :) I have similar unit tests, and they are able to create local accounts within mstest. Whether this is good practice is another matter.

I see you already did as this page suggests: set the app domain's principal policy to "WindowsPrincipal". For me, Thread.CurrentPrincipal.Identity.Name gives my user name and the test passes using VS 2005 and VS 2008 targetting .NET 2.0, 3.0 & 3.5.

Are you running on Vista/Win7 with UAC and non elevated VS? Otherwise are you able to repro either on another machine, using a different group or by creating another local admin account on your machine and running the tests as this user?

share|improve this answer
    
When I run the test, the CurrentPrincipal has an unauthenticated GenericIdentity so I don't believe the test code would be able to create or delete a local account. – Mark Good Jul 9 '09 at 20:50
    
I am running VS on XP as admin. Ray's suggestion worked, but left me with other security concerns. See the comments that I left Ray. – Mark Good Jul 10 '09 at 13:52

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