Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I tried debugging my code for like a few hour but I got nothing out of it. The issue is that it makes absolutely no sense on why it reports an error every time I tried to use document.forms[0][i] (i as the iterator) in the event listener but "this" satisfies the code.

//broken
var addListeners = function() {
    var i;
    var formFields = document.forms[0];
    var formSubmit = formFields["submit"];

    for (i = 0; i < formFields.length; i++) {
        if (formFields[i] != formSubmit) {
            formFields[i].onblur = (function () {
                checkNonEmpty(formFields[i]);
            });
        }
    }
};

//works
var addListeners = function() {
    var i;
    var formFields = document.forms[0];
    var formSubmit = formFields["submit"];

    for (i = 0; i < formFields.length; i++) {
        if (formFields[i] != formSubmit) {
            formFields[i].onblur = (function () {
                checkNonEmpty(this);
            });
        }
    }
};

Wouldn't "this" refer to document.forms[0][i]?... formFields references to document.forms[0]. However the exact same code (with "this" where formFields[i] is at) works just fine.

Here is the demo: http://jsfiddle.net/PbHwy/

share|improve this question
    
Please post the exact error message. It also helps if you provide a little demo. You can use http://jsfiddle.net for this. –  Zeta Jun 16 '12 at 8:17
    
When the onblur event occurs on the form field... Here is the error that pops up in the dev console "Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'value' of undefined". –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 8:19
    
Okay I provided a demo. =) –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 8:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Cranio's answer already contains the root of the matter. To get rid of this you can either include formFields[i] by using closures

var blurCallbackGenerator = function(element){
    return function () {
        checkNonEmpty(element);
    };
};
formFields[i].onblur = blurCallbackGenerator(formFields[i]);

/* // dense version:
formFields[i].onblur = (function(element){
    return function () {
        checkNonEmpty(element);
    };
})(formFields[i]);
*/

or simply using this.

See also:

share|improve this answer
    
I read the link but I don't understand the logic of returning an anonymous function inside the event handler. This really confuses me. :( Does it create a new scope or something? –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 8:52
    
@W3Geek: You have to create a function for each formFields[i] which is independent from i, since i will change its value. I changed my code a little bit so that it's easier to see. –  Zeta Jun 16 '12 at 8:58
    
I think I figured it out but don't quote me on it. So every time "i" iterates a new function will be returned. In my broken code, "i" kept on iterating and it either confused or overwrite the previous onblur callback? –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 9:06
1  
@W3Geek: JavaScript uses references - so all is are the same in your current listeners. Your loop will exit if and only if i === formFields.length. After this a onblur event will try to execute checkNonEmpty(formFields[i]), which is now checkNonEmpty(formFields[formFields.length]), thus resulting in a TypeError. This is why you have to get i or the specific element bound to your function. This can be easily achieved with closures. –  Zeta Jun 16 '12 at 9:16
    
Perfect answer! :) When I was debugging the code I knew something was up with the i's. I need to study up more on this subject. –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 9:28

Because you define formFields in a scope outside (or better, different than) the event listener. When the event listener is called, it is called not in the addListeners function where you define formFields, but "independently", so the reference is lost and its value is undefined (but this works because it is not dependent on that scope).

share|improve this answer
1  
Specifically it works because "this" is in a new scope at this point. –  jcolebrand Jun 16 '12 at 8:18
    
Yeah, I bet I should rephrase :) –  Cranio Jun 16 '12 at 8:19
    
No, the above is wrong. The functions being created are closures, which capture their lexical environment including formFields. The problem is that they're all capturing the same variable i, whose value by the time the functions gets called is not what they're expecting it to be. –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 16 '12 at 8:21
    
Checking out Gareth's observation... –  Cranio Jun 16 '12 at 8:22
1  
W3Geek, if you want to verify my comment above then you can do so by putting alert(formFields) and/or alert(i) in the handler function and arrange for some of the handlers to be invoked. I predict that neither will say undefined but the latter will report a value that's too large and that's the same across all the handlers. –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 16 '12 at 8:30

The problem is that the variable i (referred to in each of your handlers) is the exact same variable in each of them, which by the time the loop has finished has value formFields.length+1 and is therefore wrong for all of them. Try this instead [note: the below used to say something VERY WRONG before I edited it -- thanks to Zeta for pointing out my mistake]:

var addListeners = function() {
    var i;
    var formFields = document.forms[0];
    var formSubmit = formFields["submit"];

    for (i = 0; i < formFields.length; i++) {
        if (formFields[i] != formSubmit) {
            formFields[i].onblur = (function(j) {
                return (function () {
                    checkNonEmpty(formFields[j]);
                })(i);
            });
        }
    }
};

and you'll find it works (unless there's another bug that I haven't noticed).

If you can afford to support only Javascript 1.7 and above, you can instead write your old code but make your for look like this: for (let i=0; i<formFields.length; i++). But you quite possibly can't.

share|improve this answer
    
Scopes are function based, not block based. This will result in the very same error. –  Zeta Jun 16 '12 at 8:21
    
Aiiiieeeee, you're right. Stupid stupid me. About to fix. –  Gareth McCaughan Jun 16 '12 at 8:22
    
Now this answer I can get behind. Comment cleanup –  jcolebrand Jun 16 '12 at 8:28
    
Why is return used in this function literal? I don't understand the logic behind that. –  W3Geek Jun 16 '12 at 8:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.