Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to do some menial batch tasks on my phone, and I don't want to jump through all the hoops of making an "app" with a GUI and all that just to do them (the tasks are of the type you'd hack together in BASH in five minutes on a sane system). I can't seem to find any place on the net that explains how to simply make an ordinary program (in any language, but Java is OK if that eases interaction with Android) with access to the Android API that can simply be run by SSHing into the phone and running it as a normal process. No need for an APK package, no need for a GUI, no nothing. This should be the simplest thing in the world, but every example out there seems to be first and foremost concerned with making a GUI and working with Eclipse and the SDK instead of doing the basics first.

Any tips?

(I know this is probably borderline SuperUser, but then again, there's a programming question at the bottom: How do you make an ordinary (Java) program that can be run from the terminal on an Android phone and still use the API?)

share|improve this question
    
I do think "making a GUI and working with Eclipse and the SDK" are the basics! – barry Jun 16 '12 at 18:06
    
Writing the simplest code possible (i.e. text output), compiling it and running it from a terminal on the device must surely be called more basic. – gspr Jun 17 '12 at 11:00
1  
For future reference: dalvikvm from CommonWare's answer does what I need. – gspr Jun 17 '12 at 13:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can't seem to find any place on the net that explains how to simply make an ordinary program (in any language, but Java is OK if that eases interaction with Android) with access to the Android API that can simply be run by SSHing into the phone and running it as a normal process.

That's because it's not especially important to the bulk of Android users or developers.

How do you make an ordinary (Java) program that can be run from the terminal on an Android phone and still use the API?

You are welcome to use the Scripting Layer for Android to write some scripts, but you have limited access to the Android SDK, and they cannot "simply be run by SSHing into the phone". This is supported by the SL4A team.

You are welcome to experiment with the dalvikvm command, though off the top of my head I do not recall whether or not it is available on production devices, and I do not know if it can "simply be run by SSHing into the phone". And, bear in mind that using this is completely unsupported.

You are welcome to write your own C/C++ code for ARM (or whatever CPU architecture your device runs). This "simply be run by SSHing into the phone" but has no access to the Android SDK.

I still cannot believe that that kind of stuff isn't on the first page of every Android development introduction out there.

There are over 200 million users of Android devices. What percentage of those users do you think want to "make an ordinary program... with access to the Android API that can simply be run by SSHing into the phone and running it as a normal process"? 0.01%? 0.001%? My money is on 0.0001%.

The "first page of every Android development introduction out there" should be focused on stuff that matters to closer to 100% of the user base. You, of course, are welcome to build up your own site focused on this sort of thing, to cater to those users who are interested in creating these sorts of programs.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your feedback, and I don't want to turn this into an argument (especially against someone obviously more knowledgeable than me), but I'll make a comment. S4LA seems like a nice idea, but it also appears to be reinventing the wheel. Wouldn't it be nicer to just make the API accessible through, for example, a file-based interface in a UNIXy fashion? I'm grateful for your link to info on the dalvikvm command; this is very much along the lines of what I need. As for the last paragraph: doesn't your logic also show that there's no point in general purpose computing at all? – gspr Jun 17 '12 at 11:51
    
@gspr: "Wouldn't it be nicer to just make the API accessible through, for example, a file-based interface in a UNIXy fashion?" -- it would take several pages to explain all of the reasons why that's not practical. If you want a "UNIXy" programming model on a mobile device, try Tizen (formerly known as Maemo and various other names), or try the Canonical dual-boot environment, or something along those lines. – CommonsWare Jun 17 '12 at 12:01
    
I can agree that it's not practical for the consumer (which, yes, is the vast majority of the millions of Android owners out there). But would it really cost that much to make available the API from a classical setting to those who want it? I mean, we already have the standard GNU toolchain; exposing the API would allow massive reuse of those tools. Oh and, I'm not saying this is practical for making "apps" -- I'm saying it's very, very practical for quick and dirty one-off tasks you'd solve with a BASH script in five minutes on a normal computer. – gspr Jun 17 '12 at 12:28
1  
@gspr: "But would it really cost that much to make available to those who want it?" -- a couple dozen developer-years at minimum, I'd imagine (framework rewrites, security model overhaul, modified NDK toolchain, documentation, testing, etc.). You are welcome to gather a team that forks Android to implement this. Or, you are welcome to gather a team that develops a proof of concept, then proposes working with Google on this (see the android-contrib Google Group). If you are expecting Google to address this otherwise, prepare to be disappointed. – CommonsWare Jun 17 '12 at 12:37
    
I've accepted the answer, the dalvikvm command is great. With it, I guess everything I need is at hand. Any further discussion should probably happen elsewhere (but just so we're clear: I'm not saying "Google should do so-and-so", rather, I'm expressing genuine surprise that a more UNIXy approach to the Android system isn't available to those of us for whom that saves a lot of time and effort). – gspr Jun 17 '12 at 13:00

Here : Running bash script on android device using adb

and : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=stericson.busybox&hl=en

and : http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=537827

and : http://strawp.net/archive/recipe-for-a-decent-bash-shell-in-android/

and : http://digitaldumptruck.jotabout.com/?p=938

share|improve this answer
    
The first link is along the lines of what I wanted. I still cannot believe that that kind of stuff isn't on the first page of every Android development introduction out there. Anyway, I'll wait a bit with accepting, because even though the first link of your answer really helped me, I'm still hoping for some more fleshed-out information. Thanks a lot! – gspr Jun 16 '12 at 10:10

From http://git-annex.branchable.com/design/assistant/blog/day_184__just_wanna_run_something/:

While I already have Android "hello world" executables to try, I have not yet been able to run them. Can't seem to find a directory I can write to on the Asus Transformer, with a filesystem that supports the +x bit. Do you really have to root Android just to run simple binaries? I'm crying inside.

It seems that the blessed Android NDK way would involve making a Java app, that pulls in a shared library that contains the native code. For haskell, the library will need to contain a C shim that, probably, calls an entry point to the Haskell runtime system. Once running, it can use the FFI to communicate back to the Java side, probably. The good news is that CJ van den Berg, who already saved my bacon once by developing ghc-android, tells me he's hard at work on that very thing.

and some specific advices in the comments below:

See http://kevinboone.net/android_nonroot.html for info on where in the android filesystem you have write, exec ability.

Basically you have these abilities in /data/local from adb shell (and in debuggable app's folders using run-as with adb shell), and in /data/data// for each app (for example the terminal emulator's data dir when using the terminal emulator).

...

http://git-annex.branchable.com/design/assistant/blog/day_185__android_liftoff/:

Thanks to hhm, who pointed me at KBOX, I have verified that I can build haskell programs that work on Android.

http://kevinboone.net/kbox.html:

KBOX [...] gives you the terminal emulator, a decent set of Linux utilities (supplied by busybox), ssh and rsync clients and servers, and a few other things. In addition, there are a number of add-on packages for expanded functionality.

Well, it's just about running an executable on Android, and not about writing an executable that would access Android API...

share|improve this answer

I'd recommend doing a research on XDA-Developers board

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I refuse to believe that this isn't thoroughly documented somewhere. I mean, what kind of crazy idea is it to begin with fancy-schmancy GUI stuff before doing basics such as a terminal-based "Hello, world"? – gspr Jun 16 '12 at 8:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.