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I have a homework that include a new operation (a [n] b), given:

  • a [1] b = ab
  • a [n] 1 = a
  • 2 [2] 3 = 2 [2-1] (2 [2-1] 2) 2 repeated 3 times = 2 [1] (2 [1] 2) = 222 = 16
  • 2 [2] 2 = 2 [2-1] 2 2 repeated 2 times = 2 [1] 2 = (22) = 4
  • 4 [3] 3 = 4 [3-1] (4 [3-1] 4) = 4 [2] (4 [2] 4) 4 repeated 3 times = 4 [2] (4 [1] (4 [1] ( 4 [1] 4))) =
    = 4 [2] 4 444

I don't need a solution, I just need advice so that I can solve it myself.

share|improve this question
    
Please edit your question to improve the formatting. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 16 '12 at 11:14
    
You cant overload operators in C. –  RedX Jun 16 '12 at 11:14
    
Are you trying say you want to implement a recursive function that raises a number to an integer power? –  mathematician1975 Jun 16 '12 at 11:29
    
No it's just a new operation that I should write a recursive function for, not a power function. –  Rawhi Jun 16 '12 at 11:33
    
@RedX I'm not trying to overload anything in C –  Rawhi Jun 16 '12 at 11:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is being said here can be rephrased as follows.

For any positive integers a, b and n define

    a [n] b = a [n-1] ( a [n-1] ( ... a ) ) taken b times

In a C-like language

int myoperator (a, n, b) {
    int x, i;
    x = a;
    if (n == 1){
       x = pow(a,b);
    } else {
       for(i = 1; i < b; i++){
           x = myoperator (a, [n-1], x);
       }
    return x;
}

Note that the values will grow quickly and get out of the range of machine integers very soon.

Note also that a[n]b can be defined as

 a [n] b = a [n-1] ( a [n-1] (b-1) ).

using this definition the for loop above can be eliminated.

int myoperator (a, n, b) 
int a,n,b;
{
    int x;
    x = a;
    if (n == 1) 
        x = pow(a,b);
    else if (b == 1) 
                x = a;
         else {
              assert(b>1 && n>1);
              x = myoperator (a, n-1, myoperator(a,n-1,b-1));
         }
    return x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, but your solution including 'for' statement is there a way to do it without 'for' !? –  Rawhi Jun 16 '12 at 11:37
    
@Rawhi yes, it is possible to replace for with a recursive call. –  Dmitri Chubarov Jun 16 '12 at 11:46

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