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I have a few columns in an SQL server 2008 R2 database that i need to convert from local time (the time zone the sql server is in) to UTC.

I have seen quite a few similar questions on StackOverflow, but the answers all fail to work correctly with daylight saving time, they only take into account the current difference and offset the date.

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Do you have to deal with times from during DST transitions (where two UTC values may be a valid result for a single local time)? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 16 '12 at 12:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I could not find any way at all doing this using T-SQL alone. I solved it using SQL CLR:

public static class DateTimeFunctions
{
    [SqlFunction(IsDeterministic = true, IsPrecise = true)]
    public static DateTime? ToLocalTime(DateTime? dateTime)
    {
        if (dateTime == null) return null;
        return dateTime.Value.ToLocalTime();
    }

    [SqlFunction(IsDeterministic = true, IsPrecise = true)]
    public static DateTime? ToUniversalTime(DateTime? dateTime)
    {
        if (dateTime == null) return null;
        return dateTime.Value.ToUniversalTime();
    }
}

And the following registration script:

CREATE FUNCTION ToLocalTime(@dateTime DATETIME2) RETURNS DATETIME2 AS EXTERNAL NAME AssemblyName.[AssemblyName.DateTimeFunctions].ToLocalTime; 
GO
CREATE FUNCTION ToUniversalTime(@dateTime DATETIME2) RETURNS DATETIME2 AS EXTERNAL NAME AssemblyName.[AssemblyName.DateTimeFunctions].ToUniversalTime; 

It is a shame to be forced to go to such effort to convert to and from UTC time.

Note, that these functions interpret local time as whatever is local to the server. It is recommended to have clients and servers set to the same time zone to avoid any confusion.

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1  
Thank you for your input. In my case it was not something I needed to do more than once, it was part of an upgrade to the database where local time was used and i ended up just creating a standalone application to do the upgrade. But i have chosen to accept this as an answer because it deserves it. –  user1450824 Jun 24 '12 at 11:22
    DECLARE @convertedUTC datetime, @convertedLocal datetime
    SELECT DATEADD(
                    HOUR,                                    -- Add a number of hours equal to
                    DateDiff(HOUR, GETDATE(), GETUTCDATE()), -- the difference of UTC-MyTime
                    GetDate()                                -- to MyTime
                    )

    SELECT @convertedUTC = DATEADD(HOUR,DateDiff(HOUR, GETDATE(), GETUTCDATE()),GetDate()) --Assign the above to a var

    SELECT DATEADD(
                    HOUR,                                    -- Add a number of hours equal to
                    DateDiff(HOUR, GETUTCDATE(),GETDATE()), -- the difference of MyTime-UTC
                    @convertedUTC                           -- to MyTime
                    )

    SELECT @convertedLocal = DATEADD(HOUR,DateDiff(HOUR, GETUTCDATE(),GETDATE()),GetDate()) --Assign the above to a var


    /* Do our converted dates match the real dates? */
    DECLARE @realUTC datetime = (SELECT GETUTCDATE())
    DECLARE @realLocal datetime = (SELECT GetDate())

    SELECT 'REAL:', @realUTC AS 'UTC', @realLocal AS 'Local'
    UNION
    SELECT 'CONVERTED:', @convertedUTC AS 'UTC', @convertedLocal AS 'Local'
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Does not account for DST :( –  Sune Rievers Nov 13 '12 at 8:54

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