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I have the following code in which I have a parent class and its child. I am trying to determine how the code benefits from using polymorphism.

class FlyingMachines {
    public void fly() {
        System.out.println("No implementation");
    }
}

class Jet extends FlyingMachines {
    public void fly() {
        System.out.println("Start, Taxi, Fly");
    }

    public void bombardment() {
        System.out.println("Throw Missile");
    }
}

public class PolymorphicTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        FlyingMachines flm = new Jet();
        flm.fly();

        Jet j = new Jet();
        j.bombardment();
        j.fly();
    }
}

What is the advantage of polymorphism when both flm.fly() and j.fly() give me the same answer?

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1  
I think he wants to know Is there any Difference Between flm.fly() and j.fly()? If yes? than What? –  khan Jun 16 '12 at 15:06
1  
Exactly. Thanks @Shaharyar –  baig772 Jun 16 '12 at 15:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

let's look at OO design first, inheritance represents a IS-A relationship, generally we can say something like "let our FlyingMachines fly". every specific FlyingMachines (sub class) IS-A FlyingMachines (parent class), let say Jet, fits this "let our FlyingMachines fly", while we want this flying actually be the fly function of the specific one (sub class), that's polymorphism take over.

so we do things in abstract way, oriented interfaces and base class, do not actually depend on detail implementation, polymorphism will do the right thing!

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hmm yes it clears my confusion :) –  baig772 Jun 18 '12 at 12:30

In your example, the use of polymorphism isn't incredibly helpful since you only have one subclass of FlyingMachine. Polymorphism becomes helpful if you have multiple kinds of FlyingMachine. Then you could have a method that accepts any kind of FlyingMachine and uses its fly() method. An example might be testMaxAltitude(FlyingMachine).

Another feature that is only available with polymorphism is the ability to have a List<FlyingMachine> and use it to store Jet, Kite, or VerySmallPebbles.

One of the best cases one can make for using polymorphism is the ability to refer to interfaces rather than implementations.

For example, it's better to have a method that returns as List<FlyingMachine> rather than an ArrayList<FlyingMachine>. That way, I can change my implementation within the method to a LinkedList or a Stack without breaking any code that uses my method.

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1  
+1, but a more related example to demonstrate usefulness might be using a List<FlyingMachine> rather than a List<Jet>. –  cheeken Jun 16 '12 at 15:00
    
@cheeken I was just updating my answer as you posted that. See my updates. –  Tim Pote Jun 16 '12 at 15:02

The reason why you use polymorphism is when you build generic frameworks that take a whole bunch of different objects with the same interface. When you create a new type of object, you don't need to change the framework to accommodate the new object type, as long as it follows the "rules" of the object.

So in your case, a more useful example is creating an object type "Airport" that accepts different types of FlyingMachines. The Airport will define a "AllowPlaneToLand" function, similar to:

//pseudocode
void AllowPlaneToLand(FlyingMachine fm)
{
    fm.LandPlane();
}

As long as each type of FlyingMachine defines a proper LandPlane method, it can land itself properly. The Airport doesn't need to know anything about the FlyingMachine, except that to land the plane, it needs to invoke LandPlane on the FlyingMachine. So the Airport no longer needs to change, and can continue to accept new types of FlyingMachines, be it a handglider, a UFO, a parachute, etc.

So polymorphism is useful for the frameworks that are built around these objects, that can generically access these methods without having to change.

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Both flm.fly() and j.fly() give you the same answer because of the type of the instance is actually the same, which is Jet, so they are behave the same.

You can see the difference when you:

FlyingMachines flm = new FlyingMachines();
flm.fly();

Jet j = new Jet();
j.bombarment();
j.fly();

Polymorphism is define as same method signature with difference behaviour. As you can see, both FlyingMachines and Jet have method fly() defined, but the method is implemented differently, which consider as behave differently.

See aa

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No, overriding is defined as the same method signature with different behavior. Polymorphism is a broader view that essentially encompassing constructing an object of one type, and treating it as another type (ie, treating Jet as a FlyingMachine). Inheritance, overriding and overloading are tools that allow you to achieve effective polymorphism (overriding and overloading are what is called ad-hoc polymorphism). –  Matt Jun 16 '12 at 16:02

It doesn't add much if you are going to have just Jets, the advantage will come when you have different FlyingMachines, e.g. Aeroplane

Now that you've modified to include more classes, the advantage of polymorphism is that abstraction from what the specific type (and business concept) of the instance you receive, you just care that it can fly

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Thanks @Sebastian Piu - Let me add two more child classes 1) Heli 2) Aeroplane - So i know my question is still same. –  baig772 Jun 16 '12 at 14:59

The good reason for why Polymorphism is need in java is because the concept is extensively used in implementing inheritance.It plays an important role in allowing objects having different internal structures to share the same external interface.

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polymorphism as stated clear by itself, a one which mapped for many.

java is a oops language so it have implementation for it by abstract, overloading and overriding

remember java would not have specification for run time polymorphism.

it have some best of example for it too.

public abstract class Human {

    public abstract String getGender();

}

class Male extends Human
{
    @Override
    public String getGender() {
        return "male";
    }
}

class Female extends Human
{
    @Override
    public String getGender() {
        return "female";
    }
}

Overriding

redefine the behavior of base class. for example i want to add a speed count int the existing functionality of move in my base Car.

Overloading

can have behavior with same name with different signature. for example a particular president speaks clear an loud but another one speaks only loud.

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