Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code in PHP writing views to a text-file and just increasing the number. My question is here: What happens if two or more people are using my site and running the PHP script? Will the server handle it? Will the increasement be saved to the file?

Here is my code (if it helps):

<?php

    $clicks = file_get_contents("clicks.txt");
    $clicks++;

        $fp = fopen("clicks.txt", "w+");
        fwrite($fp, $clicks);
        fclose($fp);

//give the count to the user
echo "result: $clicks";

    ?>
share|improve this question
3  
Why are you using a plain file here? Redis or even MySQL with the query UPDATE table SET field = field + 1; are much easier to implement and already handle locking for you. –  PhpMyCoder Jun 20 '12 at 10:48
    
Is Redis or MySQL free? –  user1431627 Jun 20 '12 at 10:50
    
Of course! redis.io mysql.com –  PhpMyCoder Jun 20 '12 at 10:52
1  
Yes, but how do I set up like an online account. I remember a friend had a MySQL server at PHPMyAdmin. –  user1431627 Jun 20 '12 at 11:02
1  
You don't set up an online account. Most hosting providers have mysql included when you purchase hosting services. Some may even allow you to run Redis. –  PhpMyCoder Jun 20 '12 at 11:10

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

First of all: This is not the way I would write a click counter.

That said, 100 users hitting your server at the same time (with initial clicks at 0) might result in a recorded number of 1..100 with low (=wrong) values being prominent.

  • If you want to count in a text file, lock as in @lanzz's answer and be prepared for a major performance hit - you are effectivly serializing the requests.
  • If you want to count in any file, consider SQlite and prepare for a manageable performance hit
  • If you just want to count, consider a real DB with a very small performance hit

EDIT: Implementations

I created the below implementations for a file counter in a text file, SQLite and MySQL

Please do not flame me for using the mysql_*() function family - as allways the code is meant to be instructive, not productive: instructive in the sense of concentrating on the issue at hand, not the surrounding layers.

counter-file.php:

<?php

//acquire file handle
$fd=fopen('counter.txt','c+b');
if (!$fd) die("Can't acquire file handle");

//lock the file - we must do this BEFORE reading, as not to read an outdated value
if (!flock($fd,LOCK_EX)) die("Can't lock file");

//read and sanitize the counter value
$counter=fgets($fd,10);
if ($counter===false) die("Can't read file");
if (!is_numeric($counter)) {
    flock($fd,LOCK_UN);
    die("Value in file '$counter' is not numeric");
}

//increase counter and reconvert to string
$counter++;
$counter="$counter";

//Write to file
if (!rewind($fd)) {
    flock($fd,LOCK_UN);
    die("Can't rewind file handle");
}
$num=fwrite($fd,$counter);
if ($num!=strlen($counter)) {
    flock($fd,LOCK_UN);
    die("Error writing file");
}

//Unlock the file and close file handle
flock($fd,LOCK_UN);
fclose($fd);

printf ("Counter is now %05d",$counter);
?>

counter-sqlite.php:

<?php

//counter.sqlite3 was created with 
//CREATE TABLE counter (counter NUMERIC)
//INSERT INTO counter VALUES (0)

//Open database
$dsn='sqlite:'.dirname(__FILE__).'/counter.sqlite3';
$db=new PDO($dsn);
if (!$db) die("Can't open SQlite database via DBO");

//Make exclusive
$sql="BEGIN EXCLUSIVE TRANSACTION";
if ($db->exec($sql)===false) die("Error starting exclusive transaction");

//Update counter
$sql="UPDATE counter SET counter=counter+1";
if (!$db->exec($sql)) die("Error inserting into database");

//Read value
$sql="SELECT counter FROM counter";
$result=$db->query($sql);
if (!$result) die("Error querying database");
foreach ($result as $row) $counter=$row['counter'];

//Commit
$sql="COMMIT TRANSACTION";
if (!$db->exec($sql)) die("Error committing to database");

//Print result
printf("Counter is now %05d",$counter);

?>

counter-mysql.php:

<?php

//mysql database was created with 
//CREATE TABLE counter (counter INT NOT NULL)
//INSERT INTO counter VALUES (0)

//Open database connection and select database 
$db=mysql_pconnect('127.0.0.1','redacted','redacted');
if (!$db) die("Can't open database");
if (!mysql_select_db('redacted', $db)) die("Can't select database");

//Update counter
$sql="UPDATE counter SET counter=counter+1";
$qry=mysql_query($sql,$db);
if (!$qry) die("Error updating database");

//Read value
$sql="SELECT counter FROM counter";
$qry=mysql_query($sql,$db);
if (!$qry) die("Error reading from database");
$counter=mysql_fetch_array($qry,MYSQL_ASSOC);
if (!$counter) die("Error reading result");

//Print result
printf("Counter is now %05d",$counter['counter']);

?>

As for the performance: I stand corrected. The SQLite implementation is 100 times slower than the two others - this is because I had to accept, that nothing else than START EXCLUSIVE TRANSACTION would end a test of ab -n 1000 -c 50 http://127.0.0.1/stackoverflow/counter/counter-sqlite.php with 1000 clicks counted.

My recommendation for the OP is to use the MySQL version - it is fast and will reliably save the counter over an OS crash. The file version has nearly the same performance characteristics, but it can quite easily be destroyed by an OS crash.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you think I should do this? I am kinda new to this. –  user1431627 Jun 16 '12 at 17:05
    
w3schools.com/php/php_mysql_intro.asp is a great introduction to using MySQL with PHP –  Oliver Ridgway Jun 21 '12 at 16:23
    
@user1431627 updated my answer –  Eugen Rieck Jun 26 '12 at 13:49
1  
Also: Please, don't use mysql_* functions for new code. They are no longer maintained and the community has begun the deprecation process. See the red box? Instead you should learn about prepared statements and use either PDO or MySQLi. If you can't decide, this article will help to choose. If you care to learn, here is good PDO tutorial. –  Second Rikudo Jun 26 '12 at 16:00
    
@Truth You don't seem to have read my updated answer: I explicitly talked about the mysql_*() functions and their use for simplicity. You also might have noticed, that I use PDO for SQlite, as the vendor-specific sqlite3-extension is buggy (google for "Database locked"). I do not think, that prepared statements (which I happen to know quite well) are the tool of choice for easy-readability as stated. –  Eugen Rieck Jun 26 '12 at 16:07

There is no way for the server to handle it by itself. You need to implement file locking yourself. Reference.

share|improve this answer
2  
@user1431627, you really need to read the flock user comments carefully, and in particular the fine details are very different for LAMP stacks and Windows ones. Also many shared hosting services use a frontend LAMP farm with the user directory served off an NFS file service which again brings its own wrinkles. By far the most straightforward way of doing this is to use a small table in a D/B, e.g. MySQL, to hold the counter and here updates are atomic. –  TerryE Jun 16 '12 at 16:50

The behavior you're asking about depends on how the filesystem deals with file i/o, not on PHP itself. Command line scripts would have the same problem (if many of them could run concurrently).

Your code is subject to two race conditions: The disk contents of the file might change between the time you read the file and the time you open it for writing; and it might change between opening for writing and actually writing (flushing) to disk.

The first race condition means you'll be writing a stale value: You increment from 10 to 11, but another thread has already incremented from 10 to 11. You lose a click. The second race condition is more subtle: Because w+ mode truncates the file, if another thread tries to read just afterwards it will read an empty file, and probably think the count was zero. Finally, it's possible that your file contents will get corrupted. Consider the following sequence of events:

  1. thread 1 and thread 2 both read "8" from the file, then open it for writing (truncating it).
  2. thread 1 writes "9", but thread 2 is delayed for several milliseconds.
  3. in the meantime, thread 3 opens the file, reads "9", and writes "10".
  4. finally, thread 2 wakes up, writes "9" to the start of the file and exits.

The result: The file now says "90". This is a real problem whenever data of different lengths is being concurrently written.

Conclusion: Don't maintain state in a disk file unless you can reasonably expect that there will be no concurrent access. If visitors are few and far between, no problem. But if your cat video goes viral, your counter will get scrambled and you'll have to ask your parents to check their server logs and count the hits to your page.

Use a database instead: databases are designed to deal with concurrency. Arrange for access to a MySQL database (it does not require your parents to give you significant rights on the server). Without even doing that, you can learn your way around databases by installing a database for private use on your computer. If you have a Windows computer, easyPHP is a quick way to help yourself to a private webserver, php, and MySQL with one quick download.

share|improve this answer
    
But file locking would be just fine? –  user1431627 Jun 22 '12 at 14:52
    
Yes. IF your OS supports it properly (and you use it properly), it will prevent threads from interfering with each other. –  alexis Jun 22 '12 at 17:30

The code below will implement your code, but with file locking. When a file can not be locked it will wait for half a second and try again.

<?php

    $clicks = file_get_contents("clicks.txt");
    $clicks++;

    $fp = fopen("clicks.txt", "w+");

    while ( !flock($fp, LOCK_EX) ) {    
        usleep(500000); // Delay half a second
    }

    fwrite($fp, $clicks);
    fclose($fp);
    flock($fp, LOCK_UN);

    //give the count to the user
    echo "result: $clicks";

?>
share|improve this answer
    
Will this affect the user? –  user1431627 Jun 21 '12 at 16:37
    
Not likely. Only when there are 2 concurrent connections at the exact same microsecond, the 2nd request would get half a second delay and try again. Worst case scenario would be when the file would be locked by some bad script indefinatly, which would cause this bit of script to run into max_execution time. You could catch this error by adding a count to your while loop and simply not loggin anything if no lock could be obtained within say 10 attempts. –  Damien Overeem Jun 22 '12 at 7:25
    
Ah, that sounds nice. They guy who helped me with this code wrote it to count and show it at the same time. How do you do you rewrite it so on one page it counts (without showing count to user) and one where you can see the stats? –  user1431627 Jun 22 '12 at 13:20
    
If you have a page where you only want to read the file, you can use the same code, but remove th while loop with the flock (the entire block, including the usleep) and remove the flock($fp, LOCK_UN) at the end. For reading you dont need a lock. (little mistake in my original script btw. I have editet my response: the last flock had to be "flock($fp, LOCK_UN) instead of flock($fp, LOCK_EX).. the correct version unlocks the file at that point.) –  Damien Overeem Jun 22 '12 at 14:06
    
Like this: pastebin.com/yYYWvKN8 –  user1431627 Jun 22 '12 at 14:19

In your example, you can have two lock problems :

  • clicks can reset to 0
  • clicks can be erase by an another clicks

You can lock file with the flock method (http://php.net/manual/en/function.flock.php). If the lock fail, you need to retry.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would it reset and how do I flock? –  user1431627 Jun 16 '12 at 17:42
    
It could be reset because "w+" reset the file, if you read before your write the new number, file_get_contents("clicks.txt") is 0 for PHP. –  Julien DAUPHANT Jun 16 '12 at 18:11

AFAIK if the script is executed simultaneously then it will not give you two clicks but just one. You should better use a database for this operation.

Practically, if you expect low traffic on your website, then this script will do well. But it will fail on higher loads.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But how do I do this? –  user1431627 Jun 16 '12 at 17:40
    
Why not use google analytics ? Or install a script like piwik ? (piwik.org) –  antoniom Jun 16 '12 at 17:45

Most people will desagree with such methods, however you will have problems with concurrent requests. As a solution you can make use of exclusive file locking.

check out the examples: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.flock.php

share|improve this answer
    
But then, some clicks might not get counted? –  user1431627 Jun 20 '12 at 20:06
    
no, the other client will wait for the lock to be lifted, then acquire it and proceed as planned - the execution of your code will effectively be paused at that point. –  The Surrican Jun 20 '12 at 20:07
    
Oh, that's awesome! I thought some clicks did not get to be counted! –  user1431627 Jun 20 '12 at 20:09
    
But, how do I flock this file? –  user1431627 Jun 20 '12 at 20:10
    
using the function from the link, sorry but i cant explain it better than the manual –  The Surrican Jun 20 '12 at 20:18

I think the best way to avoid collision is using a log system. You can try this log lib: http://pear.php.net/package/Log/docs/latest/Log/Log.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.