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I would like my c++ code to be as encapsulated as i can is this manner of return the iterators is ok?

const map<string,bool>::iterator getFollowers() {

        return followers.begin();

    }

    const map<string,bool>::iterator getFollowing() {

        return following.begin();

    }

the full code:

#ifndef twitClient_twitUser_h
#define twitClient_twitUser_h

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
class user {
    string username;
    map<string,bool> followers;
    map<string,bool> following;
    string name;


public:

    user(string username):username(username) {
        followers [username] = false;
        following [username] = false;
    }

    bool removeFollower (string friendName);
    bool addFollower(string friendName);
    bool stopFollowing(string friendName);
    bool startFollowing(string friendName);

    const map<string,bool>::iterator getFollowers() {

        return followers.begin();

    }

    const map<string,bool>::iterator getFollowing() {

        return following.begin();

    }


};
share|improve this question
1  
Yes, that's fine – skirkpatrick Jun 16 '12 at 16:59
    
Why don't make functions like const map<string, bool>&getFollowers() const so I can access data, but not change it. It's much more convinient, because iterator doesn't give me full control. Also, for many algorithms end iterator is also needed. So I suggest you not to use such incapsulation – Spo1ler Jun 16 '12 at 17:01
    
@MatthieuM. thanks – Spo1ler Jun 16 '12 at 17:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's nothong wrong with your approach, except that you may want to add const access methods too, foe example

map<string,bool>::const_iterator getFollowers() const;

Plus you want to add access to the end() iterators too.

Concerning encapsulation, you encapsulate the map, but your clients are exposed to map<string, bool>::iterator. There's a very interesting article about hiding those dependencies here. It is by no means trivial, but it is still worth considering.

share|improve this answer

Yes and no.

Encapsulation has several meanings.

  • In its lighter form, it means that the class has full control over the encapsulated members, which could be the case here (if you returned a const_iterator)
  • In its heavier form, it means that the class implementation details do not leak into the exterior word, which is not the case here

So, you do not let others get control over your internals (good) but you still expose the implementation details, breaking clients if you ever change how followers or following is implemented under the covers.

A possible solution is to introduce a looping construct (such as foreach):

template <typename Pred>
void user::foreachFollower(Pred& p) const {
    for (auto const& f: followers) { p(f); }
}

This is more flexible, because should you change the map from <string, bool> to <string, int> (to count the numbers instead), you can always alter the function:

template <typename Pred>
void user::foreachFollower(Pred& p) const {
    for (std::pair<std::string, bool> const& f: followers) { p(f); }
}

So that your clients are not broken. They are also elaborate tricks to detect whether the client can handle a std::pair<std::string, int> or not, but they are (a tad) harder to implement.


On another note, just giving the begin iterator is not enough, they also need the end one.

share|improve this answer

I think there may be some design issues if you consider this question further. Seems you will keep many containers in this setup and set a follower/following bool to state whether a condition is true. Back to this in a minute.

Passing back an iterator can be very dangerous if the container is manipulated from another method before / during use. So for your question I would think about passing a reference to the container to be analysed/manipulated and if multi threading is used (in these multi core days we need to always think about this) use mutex to make the container thread safe or active object type design and a simple safe queue implementation.

For this setup it may be better to consider a matrix type design if you have a closed group of users or if you have a many to many situation then perhaps consider something like boost multi index. This may provide a clearer more extensible design.

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