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What happens in the following example?

struct B { };
struct D1 : B  { };
struct D2 : B  { };
int main()
{
    D1 d;
    D2 d2;
    B& x = d;
    x = d2;
}

I know the reference is not re-assigned. x still refers to d, but then how can you assign d2 to d?

Some more:

struct B
{
    B () { x = 0; }
    int x;
    virtual void foo () { cout << "B" << endl; }
};
struct D1 : B
{
    D1 () { x = 1; }
    virtual void foo () { cout << "D1" << endl; }
};
struct D2 : B
{
    D2 () { x = 2; }
    virtual void foo () { cout << "D2" << endl; }
};

int main()
{
D1 d;
D2 d2;
B& x = d;
x.foo();   //D1
               //x.x is 1 here
x = d2;
x.foo();   //also D1
               //but x.x is 2 here
}

It seems like x.x was updated, but the vftable was not... Why?

share|improve this question
    
+1. Good question. –  Nawaz Jun 16 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

x refers to the B base class subobject of d. The assignment x = d2 slices the B base subobject from d2 and assigns its value to the subobject of d.

This is usually not done intentionally.

EDIT:

It seems like x.x was updated, but the vftable was not... Why?

That is what the assignment operator B::operator= does. Base classes in C++ are totally unaware that they are base classes. Also, the type of an object cannot ever be changed during its lifetime. The closest alternative is C++11's std::move, which can transfer the old B object inside a D1 into a fresh D2 object. You would then destroy the old object.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, can copy assignment be made virtual, by the way? (too lazy to try / look it up) –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 16 '12 at 17:45
    
I thought using references prevents slicing... no? –  AMCoder Jun 16 '12 at 17:45
    
Honestly, I didn't know this. Actually I didn't think about this before. +1. –  Nawaz Jun 16 '12 at 17:45
1  
@AMCoder Using references prevents slicing as soon as you create the object, but it's still possible. –  Potatoswatter Jun 16 '12 at 17:46
3  
@KonradRudolph You would need double dispatch to make it work, because the base class doesn't understand a derived argument without RTTI. –  Potatoswatter Jun 16 '12 at 17:47

If you want, you can implement the = by yourself and "avoid" the slicing by checking for the appropriate concrete type (or giving an error). See below example with errors.

struct B { 
  virtual B& operator = (B& b) = 0;
};
struct D1 : B  { 
  D1& operator = (B& b) {
    if ( dynamic_cast<D1*>(&b) == 0 ) {
      cerr << "Cannot assign non D1 to D1" << endl;
      exit(255);
    }
    // handle the assignments
    return *this;
  }
};
struct D2 : B  { 
  int c;
  D2& operator = (B& b) {
    if ( dynamic_cast<D2*>(&b) == 0 ) {
      cerr << "Cannot assign non D2 to D2" << endl;
      exit(255);
    }
    // handle the assignments
    return *this;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I think he's asking about the behavior, not how to go around it... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 16 '12 at 18:02
    
This isn't what I was asking... –  AMCoder Jun 16 '12 at 18:03
    
+1, good idea, but throw would be better than exit. –  Potatoswatter Jun 16 '12 at 18:04
    
RTTI makes baby jesus cry. Still, +1 –  Evgeni Jun 16 '12 at 19:14
    
Oh… note that the entire implementation could be D &operator=(B const & b) { return * this = dynamic_cast< D const & >( b ); }, assuming no special semantics are desired. That would throw std::bad_cast on type check failure. –  Potatoswatter Jun 17 '12 at 6:45

In your case, when you assign this way members, that do not belong to Base class will be sliced. Which means, that in this case it's copied like if your were assigning one Base class object to another.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you talking about object slicing (cause that's what it's called)? –  AMCoder Jun 16 '12 at 17:45
    
Yes, I've forgotten this term. –  Spo1ler Jun 16 '12 at 17:45

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