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Following are two pieces of code I used to compute power sets of elements in a list

code 1)

 public static List<List<int>> getCpower(List<int> list)
    {
        var result = new List<List<int>>();
        for (int i = 0; i < (1 << list.Count); i++)
        { 
            var sublist = new List<int>();
            for (int j = 0; j < list.Count; j++)
            {   if ((i & (1 << j)) != 0)
                {   sublist.Add(list[j]); 
                }
            }
            result.Add(sublist); 
        }

        return result;
    }

code 2)

public static List<List<int>> getCpower(List<int> list)
    {
        var result = new List<List<int>>();var sublist = new List<int>();
        for (int i = 0; i < (1 << list.Count); i++)
        { 
            sublist.Clear();sublist.TrimExcess();
            for (int j = 0; j < list.Count; j++)
            {   if ((i & (1 << j)) != 0)
                {   sublist.Add(list[j]); 
                }
            }
            result.Add(sublist); 
        }

        return result;
    }

The first code used a new statement and if i try to find out powersets of list with count 30 then OutOfMemoryException arises.So to save memory i used Clear() and TrimExcess() to get the list as if it were initialized using a new statement in code2. But these two codes return different results. I do not get why is this happening. Please help.

Are the two following two pieces not doing the same thing

   for(....)   
      {
       var sublist = new List<int>();
       for(......)
           {
            //some code
           }
      }

and

 var sublist = new List<int>();
 for(.....)
    {
      sublist.Clear();sublist.TrimExcess();
      for(.... )
      {
      //some code 
      }
    }
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I guess you know you will get 1073741824 sets with 30 –  L.B Jun 16 '12 at 18:02
    
2^30. Yes I do have an idea how large the power set is. –  Dynamite Jun 16 '12 at 18:20
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your second code, you only have a single nested list - you're adding several references referring to the same sublist, which is pointless.

Have you considered that maybe the reason you're running out of space with your first code is because you're fundamentally trying to hold too much data in memory at a time?

You could consider returning an IEnumerable<List<int>> like this:

public static IEnumerable<List<int>> getCpower(List<int> list)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < (1 << list.Count); i++)
    { 
        var sublist = new List<int>();
        for (int j = 0; j < list.Count; j++)
        {   if ((i & (1 << j)) != 0)
            {   
                sublist.Add(list[j]); 
            }
        }
        yield return sublist;
    }
}

This will now be lazily evaluated - so you could iterate over the top-level sequence, but unless the lists are retained by the caller, you'll only have a single list in memory at a time.

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Can you explain the "yield return sublist;". Does it adds the contents of sublist to result and frees the space the used by sublist ?? –  Dynamite Jun 16 '12 at 18:16
    
@Dynamite: It's a complicated feature called "iterator blocks". See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dscyy5s0.aspx –  Jon Skeet Jun 16 '12 at 18:23
    
Still my problem isn't solved. I am still getting the OutofMemoryException and I have to run the function for even higher counts. –  Dynamite Jun 16 '12 at 19:56
    
@Dynamite: Well what are you doing with the lists when you're iterating over them? If you're just handling them in a way which doesn't remember any data, it should be fine. –  Jon Skeet Jun 16 '12 at 19:59
    
Here is what i am doing. I have a sequence of bits. Some of those are set to 1s. With these set to 1s I have to generate all possible combinations that can result out of varying 0 and 1 over remaining positions. So I find out the power set of the remaining indexes and set 1 in corresponding to elements in the power set,which gives me all possible results. Is there any other way i can do so. –  Dynamite Jun 17 '12 at 5:57
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In the second piece of code you are clearing the list of results. This alters the outcome of your algorithm. You are throwing away your results because you are reusing the same list instance for all iterations.

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In the second code example, you only ever have a single sublist instance. That same instance is cleared and added to the list again every time you loop through. Here's an example to help you understand:

var sublist = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
var result = new List<List<int>> { sublist };
//result[0] is now {1, 2, 3}
sublist.Clear();
//result[0] is now {}
result.Add(sublist);
//result[0], result[1], and sublist are the same instance
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