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const char *sentence = "He was not in the cab at the time.";

printf("\"%s\" has %d spaces\n", sentence, (int) ^ {
    int i = 0;
     int countSpaces = 0;

    while (sentence[i] != '\0') {
        if (sentence[i] == 0x20) {
            countSpaces++;
        }
        i++;
    }    
    return countSpaces;
});

This code simply counts the white space in a string, but for some reason it says 1606416608 spaces rather than 8. I'm not exactly sure what is going wrong, so thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
3  
While Jesse has answered your technical question, the better question is why in the world you would structure your code this way? Just perform the calculation to compute a value and then pass that value into printf(). Don't use blocks here. They only make the code worse. – Ken Thomases Jun 16 '12 at 23:32
    
What @KenThomases said; you are far far better off calculating the # of spaces first, then using that variable in the printf, no block needed. While blocks are wonderfully useful, this isn't a situation where they should be used. – bbum Jun 17 '12 at 0:04
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're passing the actual block to printf, not the result of the block. Instead, try

const char *sentence = "He was not in the cab at the time.";

printf("\"%s\" has %d spaces\n", sentence, (int) ^ {
    int i = 0;
    int countSpaces = 0;

    while (sentence[i] != '\0') {
        if (sentence[i] == 0x20) {
            countSpaces++;
        }
        i++;
    }    
    return countSpaces;
}()); // <-- note the extra parentheses here, indicating that you're calling the block
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I never would have guessed that -- you just saved me hours of time! Thanks for the quick reply! – Jordan Jun 16 '12 at 19:29
1  
More specifically, blocks are objects, and a block expression evaluates to a pointer to the block object. He is casting the pointer into an integer. – newacct Jun 16 '12 at 23:21
1  
@newacct, no, that's not what's happening. The parentheses after the block definition cause the block to be invoked. – Ken Thomases Jun 16 '12 at 23:31
    
Oh, I was talking about the OP's code, as a clarification to "passing the actual block". – newacct Jun 16 '12 at 23:32

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