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I have a dataframe with over 200 columns (don't ask why). The issue is as they were generated the order is

['Q1.3','Q6.1','Q1.2','Q1.1',......]

I need to re-order the columns as follows:

['Q1.1','Q1.2','Q1.3',.....'Q6.1',......]

Is there some way for me to do this within python?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 84 down vote accepted
df.reindex_axis(sorted(df.columns), axis=1)

This assumes that sorting the column names will give the order you want. If your column names won't sort lexicographically (e.g., if you want column Q10.3 to appear after Q9.1), you'll need to sort differently, but that has nothing to do with pandas.

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1  
I like this because the same method can be used to sort rows (I needed to sort rows and columns). While it's the same method, you can omit the axis argument (or provide its default value, 0), like df.reindex_axis(sorted(non_sorted_row_index)) which is equivalent to df.reindex(sorted(non_sorted_row_index)) – The Red Pea Nov 17 '15 at 19:57

You can also do more succinctly:

df.sort_index(axis=1)

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2  
best solution on here – O.rka Oct 27 '15 at 17:12

You can just do:

df[sorted(df.columns)]
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1  
I get "'DataFrame' object is not callable" for this. Version: pandas 0.14. – A.S Jan 29 '15 at 10:39

Tweet's answer can be passed to BrenBarn's answer above with

data.reindex_axis(sorted(ls, key=lambda x: float(x[1:])), axis=1)

So for your example, say:

vals = randint(low=16, high=80, size=25).reshape(5,5)
cols = ['Q1.3', 'Q6.1', 'Q1.2', 'Q9.1', 'Q10.2']
data = DataFrame(vals, columns = cols)

You get:

data

    Q1.3    Q6.1    Q1.2    Q9.1    Q10.2
0   73      29      63      51      72
1   61      29      32      68      57
2   36      49      76      18      37
3   63      61      51      30      31
4   36      66      71      24      77

Then do:

data.reindex_axis(sorted(ls, key=lambda x: float(x[1:])), axis=1)

resulting in:

data


     Q1.2    Q1.3    Q6.1    Q9.1    Q10.2
0    2       0       1       3       4
1    7       5       6       8       9
2    2       0       1       3       4
3    2       0       1       3       4
4    2       0       1       3       4
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Don't forget to add "inplace=True" to Wes' answer or set the result to a new DataFrame.

df.sort_index(axis=1, inplace=True)
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If you need an arbitrary sequence instead of sorted sequence, you could do:

sequence = ['Q1.1','Q1.2','Q1.3',.....'Q6.1',......]
your_dataframe = your_dataframe.reindex(columns=sequence)

I tested this in 2.7.10 and it worked for me.

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The quickest method is:

df.sort_index(axis=1)

Be aware that this creates a new instance. Therefore you need to store the result in a new variable:

sortedDf=df.sort_index(axis=1)
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print df.sort_index(by='Frequency',ascending=False)

where by is the name of the column,if you want to sort the dataset based on column

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For several columns, You can put columns order what you want:

#['A', 'B', 'C'] <-this is your columns order
df = df[['C', 'B', 'A']]

This example shows sorting and slicing columns:

d = {'col1':[1, 2, 3], 'col2':[4, 5, 6], 'col3':[7, 8, 9], 'col4':[17, 18, 19]}
df = pandas.DataFrame(d)

You get:

col1  col2  col3  col4
 1     4     7    17
 2     5     8    18
 3     6     9    19

Then do:

df = df[['col3', 'col2', 'col1']]

Resulting in:

col3  col2  col1
7     4     1
8     5     2
9     6     3     
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The sort method and sorted function allow you to provide a custom function to extract the key used for comparison:

>>> ls = ['Q1.3', 'Q6.1', 'Q1.2']
>>> sorted(ls, key=lambda x: float(x[1:]))
['Q1.2', 'Q1.3', 'Q6.1']
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This works for lists in general and I am familiar with it. How do I apply it to a pandas DataFrame? – pythOnometrist Jun 17 '12 at 2:24
    
Not sure, I admit my answer was not specific to this library. – tweet Jun 17 '12 at 3:04

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