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Let's assume this scenario in Visual C++ 2010:

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>

using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
    int b;
    void Display()
    {
        cout<<"Base: Non-virtual display."<<endl;
    };
    virtual void vDisplay()
    {
        cout<<"Base: Virtual display."<<endl;
    };
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    int d;
    void Display()
    {
        cout<<"Derived: Non-virtual display."<<endl;
    };
    virtual void vDisplay()
    {
        cout<<"Derived: Virtual display."<<endl;
    };
};

int main()
{
    Base ba;
    Derived de;

    ba.Display();
    ba.vDisplay();
    de.Display();
    de.vDisplay();

    _getch();
    return 0;
};

Theoretically, the output of this little application should be:

  • Base: Non-virtual display.
  • Base: Virtual display.
  • Base: Non-virtual display.
  • Derived: Virtual display.

because the Display method of the Base class is not a virtual method so the Derived class should not be able to override it. Right?

The problem is that when I run the application, it prints this:

  • Base: Non-virtual display.
  • Base: Virtual display.
  • Derived: Non-virtual display.
  • Derived: Virtual display.

So either I didn't understand the concept of virtual methods or something strange happens in Visual C++.

Could someone help me with an explanation?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
you would absolutely have Base: Non-virtual display. when changing your line to de.Base::Display(). –  v.oddou Mar 28 at 3:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yep, you are misunderstanding a little.

The method of the same name on the derived class will hide the parent method in this case. You would imagine that if this weren't the case, trying to create a method with the same name as a base class non-virtual method should throw an error. It is allowed and it's not a problem - and if you call the method directly as you have done it will be called fine.

But, being non-virtual, C++ method lookup mechanisms that allow for polymorphism won't be used. So for example if you created an instance of your derived class but called your 'Display' method via a pointer to the base class, the base's method will be called, whereas for 'vDisplay' the derived method would be called.

For example, try adding these lines:

Base *b = &ba;
b->Display();
b->vDisplay();
b = &de;
b->Display();
b->vDisplay();

...and observe the output as expected:

Base: Non-virtual display.
Base: Virtual display.
Base: Non-virtual display.
Derived: Virtual display.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @sje397, thank you for your reply. Can you write an example of calling the method, as you said, via a pointer to the base class? Thank you! –  Leif Lazar Jun 17 '12 at 0:31
    
@Leif Lazar: done. –  sje397 Jun 17 '12 at 12:23
    
also as I said you can ALSO call the (non-virtual) base method from the derived instance, using scope resolution syntax. –  v.oddou Mar 28 at 3:47
    
So, just to be sure, I can define a method in base class, and override it in derived class, irrespective of declaring it as virtual or not. The only difference is that if a base pointer points to a derived class object, then calling that method will cal the base class' method if it is not virtual, and the derived class' method if it is virtual. Is that right? Is there any other difference? –  Cupidvogel Nov 8 at 21:40
    
@Cupidvogel Yep, that's correct. Declaring it 'virtual' means C++ will use mechanisms to support polymorphism and check to see if there is a more derived version of the method when you call via a base class pointer. I can't think of any other difference. –  sje397 Nov 9 at 8:07

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