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I'm using the Maclaurin series for arctan(x) and I am not getting the correct answer. I'm doing the calculation in radians. Here's the function so far:

fp32 t32rArcTangent(fp32 number)
{
fp32 a, b, c, d;    /* Temp Variables */
fp32 t;             /* Number Temp */
uint32 i;           /* Loop Counter */

/* Time Savers */
if (b32fpcomp(number, MM_FP8INFINITY)) return((fp32)MM_PI / 2);
if (b32fpcomp(number, -MM_FP8INFINITY)) return(-(fp32)MM_PI / 2);

/* Setup */
a = 0;
b = 0;
c = 1;
d = number;
t = number * number;

/* Calculation Loop */
for (i = 0; i < MMPRVT_FP32_TRIG_LIMIT; i++)
  {
    b += d;
    if (b32fpcomp(a, b)) break;
    a = b;
    c += 2;
    d *= -1 * t / c;
  }
#ifdef DEBUG
printf("Loops: %lu\n", i);
#endif

/* Result */
return(a);

fp32 = typedef'd float

uint32 = typedef'd unsigned long int

MM_FP8INFINITY is the largest number that the fp32 datatype can contain.

MM_PI is just PI out to about 50 digits.

MMPRVT_FP32_TRIG_LIMIT is the maximum number of loops that can be used to calculate the result. This is to prevent the series expansion from going into an infinite loop if for whatever reason the series fails to converge.

These are the results that I am getting:

Testing arctangent(x) function.
Loops: 0
arctan(0):      0
Loops: 8
arctan(1):      0.724778414
Loops: 13
arctan(R3):     0.709577262
Loops: 6
arctan(1/R3):   0.517280579

R3 is just the square root of 3 which is 1.732050808....

Now I know that the radius of convergence of the arctan series is |x| <= 1, so I'm thinking that I have to reduce the input somehow. The problem is that for arctan, the domain of the function is (-INF, +INF). So how do you reduce that? This is being calculated to radian angles.


Thanks for pointing that out. The problem has been corrected, and I also have the input reduction done as well. Here is the completed and corrected function which now gives the correct answers:

fp32 t32rArcTangent(fp32 number)
{
fp32 a, b, c, d;    /* Temp Variables */
fp32 t;             /* Number Temp */
uint32 i;           /* Loop Counter */
uint8 fr;           /* Reduction Flag */

/* Time Savers */
if (b32isInf(number) == -1) return(-(fp32)MM_PI / 2);
if (b32isInf(number) == 1) return((fp32)MM_PI / 2);
if (b32isNaN(number)) return(number);
if (b32fpcomp(number, MM_FP8INFINITY)) return((fp32)MM_PI / 2);
if (b32fpcomp(number, -MM_FP8INFINITY)) return(-(fp32)MM_PI / 2);
if (b32fpcomp(number, ONE)) return((fp32)MM_PI / 4);
if (b32fpcomp(number, -ONE)) return(-(fp32)MM_PI / 4);

/* Reduce Input */
if (number > ONE)
    {
      number = 1 / number;
      fr = 1;
    }
  else fr = 0;

/* Setup */
a = 0;
b = 0;
c = 1;
d = number;
t = number * number;

/* Calculation Loop */
for (i = 0; i < MMPRVT_FP32_TRIG_LIMIT; i++)
  {
    b += d / c;
    if (b32fpcomp(a, b)) break;
    a = b;
    c += 2;
    d *= -1 * t;
    #ifdef DEBUG
    printf("a=%g b=%g, c=%g d=%g\n", a, b, c, d);
    #endif
  }
#ifdef DEBUG
printf("Loops: %lu\n", i);
#endif

/* Result */
if (fr != 0) a = ((fp32)MM_PI / 2) - a;
return(a);
}
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1  
What is b32fpcomp? Also, you should be using doubles and not floats. –  dirkgently Jun 17 '12 at 1:41
    
b32fpcomp is a 32-bit binary floating point comparison function. I use it to clear a warning that gcc gives saying that comparing floating point with == or != is unsafe. I don't see why, but I will humor the compiler. As for using floats, this is multiple precision, so the routines will be used for float, double, and long double datatypes when I get everything worked out. The 32 refers to float. The next datatype is fp64 which is a 64-bit float or a double. fp96 is either a 96-bit or a 128-bit float or a long double. –  Daniel Rudy Jun 17 '12 at 10:43

1 Answer 1

Think about what happens to the terms in each loop as a result of the division by c:

c += 2;
d *= -1 * t / c;

First you're dividing by 1 [implicitly, before this], and then by 3, and then by 5, which sounds good, but because you're multiplying d by this term you're effectively dividing by the product of each of the divisors. IOW, instead of

x - 1/3*x^3 + 1/5*x^5 - 1/7*x^7 + 1/9*x^9

which you want, you're computing

x - 1/(1*3)*x^3 + 1/(1*3*5)*x^5 - 1/(1*3*5*7)*x^7 + 1/(1*3*5*7*9)*x^9

You can still use your d *= -t trick, but you should move the division.

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