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I know the virtual keyword does not need to be resused in a derived class member function declaration if it overrides a virtual base function but is it good practice to do so to make it clear that it is virtual? Also, what about the presence of the const keyword in declaration and/or definition? I think Alexandrescu mentions something about this but I can't recall what it was?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Nicol Bolas, Steve Guidi, Jake Burkhead, TimWolla, brettdj Mar 22 at 3:27

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I'd go with the C++11 override at the end instead of virtual. That way if your base changes, you'll get a compiler error on top of being clear. const always applies to whatever's left unless there is nothing to the left. –  chris Jun 17 '12 at 1:43
    
You're asking us to plumb your fuzzy memory? Good luck, it sounds clearer than mine! –  Mike DeSimone Jun 17 '12 at 1:46
    
Check this out for const –  higuaro Jun 17 '12 at 1:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your question seems very confused. virtual is optional when overriding a base-class method. const is never optional if you need it. This does not do what you think it does:

struct A
{
  virtual void Func() const;
};

struct B : public A
{
  virtual void Func();
};

The struct B has two functions named Func. One of them will be called when the object it is called on is const, and the other will be called when it is not const. Nothing in this code has been overridden; these are two separate virtual functions.

You cannot just ignore the const and expect everything to work out fine.

Indeed, this example also shows why you should use virtual when you're overriding in derived classes. In this case, it's fairly obvious that you intended to override a base class function, but you got the function signature wrong. Without the virtual there, there would not be an immediate indication that you intended to override something.

It's not a huge help, but it's something.

C++11 provides a better solution (in that it actually solves the problem) with the override pseudo-keyword.

struct A
{
  virtual void Func() const;
};

struct B : public A
{
  virtual void Func() override; //Gives a compiler error, since it is not overriding a base class function.
};
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Thanks, I was actually aware of this and what I meant with const was whether to mention it in a prototype (.H) AS WELL as in the .C implementation file.. –  Palace Chan Jun 18 '12 at 0:46
    
@PalaceChan: That also is non-negotiable. Without the const, it names a different function, and therefore you'd get a compiler and/or linker error. The const is as much a part of the function's type as any of its parameters. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 18 '12 at 1:29

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