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Lets say I have a class A that is fairly simple like this -

public class A{
  private int randomField = 0;
  protected int key;
  protected double dmg;
}

Now I want to write a number of sub-classes that inherit the protected fields and only differ based on the initial values that are assigned to those fields - for example, if I wrote two subclasses B and C, the only difference between those two sub-classes would be that the values key and dmg would have different values. They would share a method, set, which would be exactly the same, in that it would affect the same variable.

I find when I'm writing these sub-classes I'm repeating myself, as I just change the constructor to set different initial values to key and dmg, and simply copy and paste the set method.

Is there a 'good' way to do this?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not a place where you should be sub-classing and in fact is a gross over-use of inheritance. If the only difference between "subclasses" are initial states of the objects, then use only one class for all, and instead simply set the states in a constructor or factory to create instances of the desired state.

e.g.,

public class A{
  private int randomField = 0;
  private int key;
  private double dmg;

  public A(int key, double dmg) {
    this.key = key;
    this.dmg = dmg;
  }

  // getters and possibly setters...
}
share|improve this answer
    
why? If I knew that B and C were going to be re-used in their form I should be creating them as distinct. Further, if I thought they were going to be distinct later, but was not sure how now, shouldn't they be distinct classes? – praks5432 Jun 17 '12 at 3:10
    
@praks: because while the states of the instances will be different, their innate behaviors of the instances will all be the same -- you're not overriding any methods at all. You can even change the behaviors if desired with a dependency injection. I think that many agree that inheritance is often over-used. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 17 '12 at 3:11
    
right, but what if I were using the same instance three or four times? Lets say I had a superclass, Weapon and a subclass Flamethrower, and I was going to use Flamethrower multiple times (because arbitrarily, multiple players can have multiple flamethrowers), shouldn't I extend then? How does your argument hold in this case? – praks5432 Jun 17 '12 at 3:15
    
@praks: This is more than just a simple difference in state since FlameThrower will have different behaviors from other Weapons such as Sword, AK47, or ThermoNuclearDevice, so yes, they likely all will descend from AbstractWeapon but will be different classes. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 17 '12 at 3:17
    
ok cool- thanks for the answer, and follow up - accepting it as soon as I can – praks5432 Jun 17 '12 at 3:17

You don't need sub-classes but instances.

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There is absolute no reason to sub-class here simply initialize different values in the constructor, sub-classing is important when you need to have same behaviour with different functionalities.

Example:

       Animal <--  Carnivores <-- Dog

Animal class here will have important features in animals, then Carnivores class will be more specific, and Dog is a specific animal.

Its better to have a Constructor with 2 param for the class A

public class A{
  private int randomField = 0;
  protected int key;
  protected double dmg;

 public A(int key, double dmg)
  {

     this.key = key;
     this.dmg = dmg;
  }
}
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