Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
Why are C# 3.0 object initializer constructor parentheses optional?

Assume this is my custom object:

public class MyObject {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int number { get; set; }

    public MyObject() {

    }
}

and this object can defined generic, or with custom constructors and a lot of more elements, so we can make an instance and set properties in two syntax

MyObject newObj1 = new MyObject { Name = "MyName", number = 10 };
MyObject newObj2 = new MyObject() { Name = "MyName", number = 10 };

Is there any differences between instance that use parentheses and another one without parentheses?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by casperOne Jul 10 '12 at 17:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

Is there any differences between instance that use parentheses and another one without parentheses?

No.

If you use ReSharper it will will flag the second construct as redundant parenthesis and will suggest that you remove them. However, it is only a matter of style.

share|improve this answer

Is there any differences between instance that use parentheses and another one without parentheses?

Yes,

The first is an implicit call to the default constructor, the second is an explicit call.

While functionally identical, the compiler sees them differently.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.