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Possible Duplicate:
Best way to detect integer overflow in C/C++

I'm a beginner to C programming and I wrote a program to read long int byte at a time and print out at the end of a whitespace. I need to configure it to catch overflow/underflow using LONG_MAX and LONG_MIN in limits.h library. I'm not allowed to cast up to anything higher than long int, and also it should detect overflow for negative numbers too. Here's my code:

int main(void)
{
    int c;
    int state;
    long int num = 0;

    while((c = getchar()) != EOF)
    {
        switch(state)
        {
            case 0:
            {
                if (isspace(c))
                {
                    //do nothing;
                }
                else
                {
                    state = 1;
                    num = 10 * num + (c - '0');
                }
                break;
            }

            case 1:
            {
                if (isspace(c))
                {
                    printf("%ld\n", num);
                    num = 0;
                    state = 0;
                    break;
                }

                num = 10 * num + (c - '0');

                if (num < LONG_MIN || num > LONG_MAX)
                {
                    printf("overflow\n");
                    break;
                }
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

The part where if (num < LONG_MIN || num > LONG_MAX) doesn't seem to work because, for example, if the input is LONG_MAX+1, it overflows and become LONG_MIN and vice versa when underflows.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by dirkgently, raina77ow, Jens Gustedt, hirschhornsalz, Evan Mulawski Jun 17 '12 at 14:00

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

Easiest way to detect overflow is to check to make sure "num" is always getting larger than what is was before.

oldnum = num;
num = 10 * num + (c - '0');

if (num < oldnum)
{
    // overflow!
    printf("overflow\n");
}

There's a few edge conditions to consider, but the above should mostly work regardless of whether num is signed, unsigned, or whatever it's width is.

share|improve this answer
    
This idea is dangerous. First, overflow might raise a signal and you'd never have a chance to check. Then your assumption only works for overflow of addition or substraction, not for multiplication. – Jens Gustedt Jun 17 '12 at 7:26
    
@JensGustedt - can you provide code that demonstrates overflow raising a signal as a result of performing integer arithmetic? – selbie Jun 17 '12 at 7:44
    
If you have gcc as a compiler using the option -ftrapv will add code for that. gcc also lets you have the inverse, with -fstrict-overflow it assumes that your arithmetic will never overflow. With that your check might be optimized out because of the compiler assuming that it is a dead branch. – Jens Gustedt Jun 17 '12 at 9:50
    
This is plain wrong. It works for unsigned but not for signed. – R.. Jun 17 '12 at 14:56

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