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I need to calculate the number of FULL month in SQL, i.e.

  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-15 => 0 full month
  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-05-16 => 1 full month
  • 2009-04-16 to 2009-06-16 => 2 full months

I tried to use DATEDIFF, i.e.

SELECT DATEDIFF(MONTH, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-15')

but instead of giving me full months between the two date, it gives me the difference of the month part, i.e.

1

anyone know how to calculate the number of full months in SQL Server?

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2  
2009-01-31 to 2009-02-28. Is that 0 or 1 full month? –  Shannon Severance Jul 9 '09 at 23:26
    
this should be a 0 –  oscarkuo Jul 9 '09 at 23:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The original post had some bugs... so I re-wrote and packaged it as a UDF.

CREATE FUNCTION FullMonthsSeparation 
(
    @DateA DATETIME,
    @DateB DATETIME
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Result INT

    DECLARE @DateX DATETIME
    DECLARE @DateY DATETIME

    IF(@DateA < @DateB)
    BEGIN
    	SET @DateX = @DateA
    	SET @DateY = @DateB
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
    	SET @DateX = @DateB
    	SET @DateY = @DateA
    END

    SET @Result = (
    				SELECT 
    				CASE 
    					WHEN DATEPART(DAY, @DateX) > DATEPART(DAY, @DateY)
    					THEN DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY) - 1
    					ELSE DATEDIFF(MONTH, @DateX, @DateY)
    				END
    				)

    RETURN @Result
END
GO

SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-05-15') as MonthSep -- =0
SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-05-16') as MonthSep -- =1
SELECT dbo.FullMonthsSeparation('2009-04-16', '2009-06-16') as MonthSep -- =2
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Thank you kind sir! –  Gundars Mēness Oct 26 '12 at 11:55
select case when DATEPART(D,End_dATE) >=DATEPART(D,sTAR_dATE) 
THEN ( case when DATEPART(M,End_dATE) = DATEPART(M,sTAR_dATE) AND DATEPART(YYYY,End_dATE) = DATEPART(YYYY,sTAR_dATE) 
        THEN 0 ELSE DATEDIFF(M,sTAR_dATE,End_dATE)END )
ELSE DATEDIFF(M,sTAR_dATE,End_dATE)-1 END
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This is for ORACLE only and not for SQL-Server:

months_between(to_date ('2009/05/15', 'yyyy/mm/dd'), 
               to_date ('2009/04/16', 'yyyy/mm/dd'))

And for full month:

round(months_between(to_date ('2009/05/15', 'yyyy/mm/dd'), 
                     to_date ('2009/04/16', 'yyyy/mm/dd')))

Can be used in Oracle 8i, Oracle 9i, Oracle 10g, Oracle 11g.

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Try:

trunc(Months_Between(date2, date1))
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what rdbms uses trunc(), not sql-server? –  bluefeet Feb 16 '12 at 21:24

DATEDIFF() is designed to return the number boundaries crossed between the two dates for the span specified. To get it to do what you want, you need to make an additional adjustment to account for when the dates cross a boundary but don't complete the full span.

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What's your definition of a month? Technically a month can be 28,29,30 or 31 days depending on the month and leap years.

It seems you're considering a month to be 30 days since in your example you disregarded that May has 31 days, so why not just do the following?

SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-15')/30
    , DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-05-16')/30
    , DATEDIFF(DAY, '2009-04-16', '2009-06-16')/30
share|improve this answer
    
I think the question the OP wants to answer is: "how many times can I increment the 'month' of the first date before it passes the second?" (with appropriate handling of years) –  John Fouhy Jul 10 '09 at 0:51
    
the fact that the OP "disregarded that May has 31 days" shows that he did not consider a month to be 30 days –  chiccodoro Mar 11 at 10:23
SELECT 12 * (YEAR(end_date) - YEAR(start_date)) +
    ((MONTH(end_date) - MONTH(start_date))) +
    SIGN(DAY(end_date) / DAY(start_date));

This works fine for me on SQL SERVER 2000.

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I googled over internet. And suggestion I found is to add +1 to the end.

Try do it like this:

Declare @Start DateTime
Declare @End DateTime

Set @Start = '11/1/07'
Set @End = '2/29/08'

Select DateDiff(Month, @Start, @End + 1)
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work for the a lot of cases, check it on his first one. –  Lance Roberts Jul 9 '09 at 23:49

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