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I want to store a function as a class member and call it inside the class? Pretty much like a callback function. My class draw a document but every document must drawn differently. So I want to assign a function (written outside of the class) into one of the members of the class and then call it when I want to draw the document.

This function mostly is responsible for transforming objects according to each specific document.

Here is my class:

class CDocument
{
public:
    CDocument();
    ~CDocument();

    void *TransFunc();
}

void Transform()
{

}

int main()
    CDocument* Doc = new CDocument();
    Doc->TransFunc = Transform();
}

I know that this is probably simple question, but I couldn't find the answer by googling or searching SO.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think, this is what you might want. Please get back to me if you have questions.

class CDocument
{
public:
    CDocument():myTransFunc(NULL){}
    ~CDocument();

    typedef void (*TransFunc)();  // Defines a function pointer type pointing to a void function which doesn't take any parameter.

    TransFunc myTransFunc;  //  Actually defines a member variable of this type.

    void drawSomething()
    {
         if(myTransFunc)
            (*myTransFunc)();   // Uses the member variable to call a supplied function.
    }
};

void Transform()
{

}

int main()
{
    CDocument* Doc = new CDocument();
    Doc->myTransFunc = Transform;  // Assigns the member function pointer to an actual function.
}
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You need to use a Pointer to member function.

typedef void (CDocument::*TransFuncPtr)();

And then you can use TransFuncPtr as an type.


With your edit It seems like you just need a Pointer to a Free function.
Here is a small working sample.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>

typedef void (*TransFuncPtr)();

class Myclass
{
     public:
     TransFuncPtr m_funcPtr;
};

void doSomething(){std::cout<<"Callback Called";}

int main()
{
    Myclass obj;
    obj.m_funcPtr = &doSomething;
    obj.m_funcPtr();
    return 0;
}
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But I want to assign a function from outside of the class. I don't want the function that I want assign into the member define inside the class. Is this how I should define the function that I want to assign into member or it's the definition of member inside the class? –  Dane Jun 17 '12 at 8:48
    
@Dane: I am sorry but I don't understand your question.The above declares a pointer to the member function CDocument::Transform().I don't seem to understand the whole inside-outside talk.If you can express your intent clearly perhaps I can help better. –  Alok Save Jun 17 '12 at 8:55
    
Sorry for bad explanation. I updated my question. I don't know is this possible in C++ in a way that I want to or not. I want simply write a function outside the class and store a pointer to that function in one of the class members, so later I can call this function inside the class. It might be similar to the concepts of Delegates in C# or Events in Delphi (Object Pascal). –  Dane Jun 17 '12 at 9:00
    
@Dane: Now Hopefully, I understand what your question is.I updated the answer. –  Alok Save Jun 17 '12 at 9:03
    
Thank you very much. That is exactly what I wanted to do, except I now get error "cannot convert from 'void' to 'TransFuncPtr'" when I want assign my function to class memeber "Doc->TransFunc = Transform();" –  Dane Jun 17 '12 at 9:05

The C declaration syntax, inherited by C++, is tricky.

Your declaration

void *TransFunc();

is actually the same as

void* TransFunc();

which declares a function returning a pointer, and not a pointer to a function.

To have the * bind to the declared name, and not to the type, you have to use an extra set of parenthesis

void (*TransFunc)();
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