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My question is: how to receive data from serial port using wpf application? I've tried a lot of times but still can't get it; Here comes my Arduino code:

    int switchPin = 7;
int ledPin = 13;
boolean lastButton = LOW;
boolean currentButton = LOW;
boolean flashLight = LOW;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(switchPin, INPUT);
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);

  Serial.begin(9600);
}

boolean debounce(boolean last)
{
  boolean current = digitalRead(switchPin);
  if (last != current)
  {
    delay(5);
    current = digitalRead(switchPin);
  }
  return current;
}

void loop()
{
  currentButton = debounce(lastButton);
  if (lastButton == LOW && currentButton == HIGH)
  {
    Serial.println("UP");

    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
  }
  if (lastButton == HIGH && currentButton == LOW)
  {
    Serial.println("DOWN");

    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  }

  lastButton = currentButton;
}

It sends messages "DOWN" and "UP" each time the button is pressed. But how to receive it from C# application? Please, write an example of such wpf app.

share|improve this question
    
Did you look at the SerialPort class? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Erno de Weerd Jun 17 '12 at 8:47
    
@Erno: sure I did. There's just a console application and it isn't working with wpf. There's a cycle while(true) and it won't work with wpf. – omtcyf0 Jun 17 '12 at 8:49
    
while(true) loops will still work in wpf, you just need to know where to put it. – MatthewRz Jun 17 '12 at 8:57
    
Just put the loop on a separate thread using the BackgroundWorker – Erno de Weerd Jun 17 '12 at 9:00

Use the Backgroundworker to start a new thread.

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    backgroundWorker1.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
}

private void startAsyncButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (backgroundWorker1.IsBusy != true)
    {
        // Prepare the SerialPort here

        backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}

private void cancelAsyncButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation == true)
    {
        // Cancel the asynchronous operation.
        backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
    }
}

// This event handler is where the time-consuming work is done.
private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;

    while(!worker.CancellationPending)
    {
        string message = _serialPort.ReadLine();
        worker.ReportProgress(someValue, message);
    }
}

// This event handler updates the progress.
private void backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    resultLabel.Text = (e.ProgressPercentage.ToString() + "% " + e.UserState);
}

// This event handler deals with the results of the background operation.
private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Cancelled == true)
    {
        resultLabel.Text = "Canceled!";
    }
    else if (e.Error != null)
    {
        resultLabel.Text = "Error: " + e.Error.Message;
    }
    else
    {
        resultLabel.Text = "Done!";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... It's... Windows forms. – omtcyf0 Jun 17 '12 at 9:26
    
That doesn't matter in this case. – Erno de Weerd Jun 17 '12 at 13:30

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