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I want to run the built program directly after compilation, so that i can build and start my program with scons.

I thought that this SConstruct-File, would start the program, whenever it is rebuilt.

main = Program( "main", [ "main.cc" ] )

test = Command( None, None, "./main >testoutput" )
Depends( test, main )

And this would start it, every time I run scons

main = Program( "main", [ "main.cc" ] )

test = Command( None, None, "./main >testoutput" )
Requires( test, main )

But both don't work, my program is never executed. What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should work better to run the program only when its built.

main = Program( "main", [ "main.cc" ] )

test = Command( target = "testoutput",
                source = "./main",
                action = "./main > $TARGET" )
Depends( test, main )

And use the AlwaysBuild() to run it every time, as mentioned by @doublep like this:

main = Program( "main", [ "main.cc" ] )

test = Command( target = "testoutput",
                source = "./main",
                action = "./main > $TARGET" )
AlwaysBuild( test )

And if you want to see the contents of the testoutput, you could do this:

(Assuming Linux. It would be more portable to print the file with some Python code instead)

main = Program( "main", [ "main.cc" ] )

test = Command( target = "testoutput",
                source = "./main",
                action = ["./main > $TARGET",
                          "cat $TARGET"] )
AlwaysBuild( test )
share|improve this answer
    
When I use # in action and source, testoutput isn't generated any more. scons prints #/main > testoutput but testoutput doesn't exist and so prints this line always. Is there a way to have this, without writing this to testoutput instead to stdout? I want to see the results immediately and don't want to look into this file. –  dinfuehr Jun 17 '12 at 11:38
    
@dinfuehr, I wont be able to test this until tomorrow morning. Does my solution work for you using "./main" with out the "#"? I dont understand your question about stdout. –  Brady Jun 17 '12 at 11:50
    
Yes, without # it works. I wanted to know if it's possible, to have the action like "./main" only (without the "> $TARGET") so that I see the output of the program directly when calling scons, without having to inspect the output file. –  dinfuehr Jun 17 '12 at 11:54
    
@dinfuehr, I would have to test that, but try using action="./main" and target=None. Doing so may make the dependency checking not work in the first example (with the Depends) and possibly in the seconds example. I'll update the answer with a better alternative. –  Brady Jun 17 '12 at 12:24
    
@dinfuehr, I was able to test this today. The '#' character is better used if you have a variant_dir. Setting the Command() target parameter as None will not work correctly, nor if you set target and source as None. If you want to execute the command after compilation and see the results, the third example in my answer works, whereby I specified a list of actions for the Command() builder. I think this is the most elegant solution. –  Brady Jun 18 '12 at 8:12

This runs ls every time SCons is run:

ls = Command ('ls', None, 'ls')
AlwaysBuild ('ls')
Default ('ls')

You never told SCons why and when it should run your command. You should e.g. add it as a dependency to some other target or make it the default target.

If you want to run command really always, i.e. regardless of what target is being built, you should probably run it using standard Python facilities for launching external programs.

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How can I run my program only after it was rebuilt? (Always running my program, now works for me) –  dinfuehr Jun 17 '12 at 10:12
    
Make the command depend on the program. Then the executable will be rebuilt (if necessary) before being run. I.e. x_program = Program ('x', ...); x = Command ('x', None, './x'); Depends ('x', x_program) –  doublep Jun 17 '12 at 10:15
    
Hmm, this doesn't work for me: Multiple ways to build the same target were specified for: x –  dinfuehr Jun 17 '12 at 10:21
    
Ah, sorry, I specified the same target for the program and command in my example. I guess you don't actually need target for the command as long as you use Python variables to create dependencies on it. –  doublep Jun 17 '12 at 10:33
    
But then the code looks exactly like my first example, doesn't it? –  dinfuehr Jun 17 '12 at 11:40

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