Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a python regular expression that will match both these URLs:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM6N3G_Battle_Mountain_State_Park
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM6N3G

and for both will capture:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM6N3G

This is what I have:

(http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/.*?)_?.*?

But it only matches:

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/

Thanks!

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
(http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/[^_]*).*
share|improve this answer
    
Better than my answer. The [^_] is great. –  Chris Thompson Jul 10 '09 at 0:29
    
Damn was too slow :(. Possibly should use + given that there should always be one or more. –  rezzif Jul 10 '09 at 6:30
    
Note that a negated character class will also match newlines. Of course, it depends on the format of the source strings whether this could be an issue. –  Geert Jul 10 '09 at 8:36

How about

(http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/[^_]+)
share|improve this answer

non regex way

url="http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM6N3G_Battle_Mountain_State_Park"
s = url.split("_")
print s[0]
share|improve this answer

*? makes something completely optional and won't be included if it doesn't have to

(http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/[^_]+)(_.*)?)
share|improve this answer

What about this:

 (http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/[a-zA-Z0-9]*)_?.*?
share|improve this answer

.*(http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM6N3G).* if it is inline

.*? is non-greedy, and so will give up everything except for one character, in this case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.