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I found this strange behaviour not only when debugging but also during normal execution (at least I imagine so, based on how the application acted).

If I use the following code (in a function that returns int):

try {
    return Integer.parseInt("3");
} catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
    System.out.println(ex.getMessage());
    return 0;
}

during debugging, after 'return Integer.parseInt("3");' the debugger jumps to 'return 0;'. It seems to be entering the catch block, but skips the System.out line and doesn't even show "ex" as an existing variable. Then the function returns 0.

But if I replace the above with the following:

int x;
try {
    x = Integer.parseInt("3");
} catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
    System.out.println(ex.getMessage());
    x = 0;
}
return x;

then everything behaves as I'd expect it to: x gets the value of 3, and 3 is returned by the function.

For the good of me, I can't figure out why this happens. Do you have any idea?

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Are you sure you're debugging with latest build? Try a clean and build again. –  m0skit0 Jun 17 '12 at 12:29
1  
Have you looked at the actual value being returned? Sometimes debuggers (due to optimizations applied) will jump to a return location which appears to be setting an inappropriate value, but in reality the return value has already been properly established. –  mah Jun 17 '12 at 12:47
    
Please show us the entire method. –  Buhb Jun 17 '12 at 13:24
    
mah is right; The function does return 3 and the problem I had was caused by something else, the debugger just threw me off. Thanks for your help, and sorry for wasting your time! –  Indridius Jun 17 '12 at 14:09
    
If you found your answer I suggest to post that answer and accept it so that people with a similar problem will see that you found the solution (more or less). It's ok to answer your own question (and you're even encouraged to do so by SO). –  IchBinKeinBaum Jun 17 '12 at 21:15

2 Answers 2

Not sure why it should do that but as an alternative suggestion:

int returnValue = 0; // set returnValue to error as default
try {
    returnValue = Integer.parseInt("3");
} catch (NumberFormatException ex) {
        System.out.println(ex.getMessage());
}
return returnValue;
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

mah said:

Have you looked at the actual value being returned? Sometimes debuggers (due to optimizations applied) will jump to a return location which appears to be setting an inappropriate value, but in reality the return value has already been properly established.

And mah was right. I'm posting this here to make it clear it's the answer.

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