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I want to ask about an edge-case scenario that I understand is very poor C++ programming form and, in all likelihood, should never be used in practice. However, I want to make certain that I understand template syntax thoroughly.

My question involves, simply, the reversal of template parameters in a template specialization. Here is sample code that most concisely demonstrates my question:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T1, typename T2>
class A
{
public:
    int foo()
    {
        return 1;
    }
};

template<typename T1, typename T2>
class A<T2, T1> // <-- Arguments reversed in template specialization
{
public:
    int foo()
    {
        return 2;
    }
};

int main()
{
    A<int, int> a;
    std::cout << a.foo(); // Output is "2"; the specialized version is called.
    return 0;
}

When I run this program, as noted, the output is "2": the specialized version of the template class is instantiated by the template compiler.

Thinking about this, I believe that it is impossible, under any circumstances, to write code in which the non-specialized version of the template class is ever instantiated by the template compiler. Because the template compiler looks for a matching specialization first, and because the two-argument specialization will always match for any client code that instantiates type A<first_type, second_type> (for which, in particular, first_type corresponds to T2 in the syntax template<typename T1, typename T2> within the definition of the specialized template), it therefore seems true that the non-specialized version cannot, under any circumstances, be reached.

Am I correct? If not, can someone please demonstrate client code that uses template class A and is able to instantiate the non-specialized version of the template?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you are right. It is not possible to reach the primary template. If you would try and instantiate it before your partial specialization was defined, your program would be ill-formed; no diagnostic required.

Recently there were thoughts about marking a partial specialization ill-formed if it isn't more specialized (by partial ordering rules) than the primary template. While your code causes no harm, people came up with another testcase where the partial specialization is not more specialized than the primary template:

template <int B, typename Type1, typename... Types>
struct A;

template<typename... Types>
struct A<0, Types...> { };

For the first parameter, the primary template is less specialized, but for the following parameter, the primary template is more specialized and the other way around vice versa. By not specializing the first parameter in the partial specialization but keeping it variable, you could even make the partial specialization be less specialized than the primary template, which is kinda weird and not the purpose of partial specializations.

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