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How can I check if a list in lisp is a dotted pair?

CL-USER 20 : 3 > (dotted-pair-p (cons 1 2))
T

CL-USER 20 : 3 > (dotted-pair-p '(1 2))
NIL

CL-USER 20 : 3 > (dotted-pair-p '(1 2 3))
NIL

I tried checking if length=2 but got error:

CL-USER 28 : 1 > (= (length (cons 2 3)) 2)
Error: In a call to LENGTH of (2 . 3), tail 3 is not a LIST.
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Note also that all proper lists are dotted pairs of a particular form. –  Marcin Jun 17 '12 at 14:34
    
Look at my answer and think about what is different between the two. length is going to assume there is an empty list. That is how it knows to stop. –  nixeagle Jun 17 '12 at 14:44
    
(= (length (cons 2 3) 2)) should be (= (length (cons 2 3)) 2). –  ffriend Jun 17 '12 at 14:46
    
Thanks, I fixed it. –  זאבי כהן Jun 17 '12 at 14:48
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A lisp list in "dotted pair notation" looks something like:

(1 . ()).

Since this is homework, I'll let you take this to the logical conclusion. Compare

(LIST 1 2) => (1 . (2 . ()))

with

(CONS 1 2) => (1 . 2).

What is different between these two? How can you tell the difference using predicates?

Remember all proper lisp lists end with the empty list. Ask yourself how do you access the second element of a cons pair? The solution from there ought to be clear.

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The difference is that the first list has an empty list in the end and the second one doesn't, but hoe=w can I find out? –  זאבי כהן Jun 17 '12 at 14:47
    
Ask yourself how, in common lisp, is the empty list represented? (eq '() ??) Fill the ?? in. And of course you need to access the second element of the cons pair. What functions have you been taught? Go through them and put the puzzle pieces together. –  nixeagle Jun 17 '12 at 14:53
    
got it, thanks a lot for the help –  זאבי כהן Jun 17 '12 at 14:59
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(not(listp(cdr (cons 1 2))))=> T
(not(listp(cdr (list 1 2))))=> nill
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3  
This answer needs some explanation to be useful; please edit it to include some. –  Xan Jun 6 at 11:32
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