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This question is specifically about PHP, but I'm guessing it might be applicable to other languages as well.

I've noticed that between PHP4 and PHP5, the designers of the language shifted away from using -1 as a return value to using constants or other forms of output. This makes sense, as -1 is not particularly evocative, and I'm guessing this practice led to confusion.

That said, I am sometimes inclined to return -1 when I want to quickly add another return option to a function, and -1 often seems like a perfectly valid way to express the outcome I am coding for.

So here are my questions:

  1. Is my observation generally correct, regarding the move away from -1 as a return value in PHP5 vs PHP4?

  2. What are the cons of returning -1, beyond for the reason I mentioned above, wherein the -1 return value doesn't contribute positively to code clarity?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is just a hunch, but in my experience there is little reason or consistency to design choices in PHP. I also find a lot of functions that return FALSE on failure, many with an added note that you have to explicitly distinguish between FALSE and other (valid) values that coerce to FALSE, e.g. 0. In such cases I think -1 is a much nicer return value.

Of course you could always just return -1 and define constants that have meaningful names and are just mapped to -1.

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4  
"there is little reason or consistency to design choices in PHP" - This could not be more true –  nickb Jun 17 '12 at 15:43

I would guess that any PHP functions that still return -1 are doing so for legacy reasons.

For simple functions where there's a logical, reasonable error response that doesn't involve returning a cryptic numeric code, then that should be used. For example, returning null, false, or 0 might be enough to communicate what happened. But for more complicated functions, especially those that can have multiple failure modes, consider breaking them up into different functions that each handle a smaller chunk of the overall task.

You can also throw exceptions:

function doSomething() {
    if (fooFails()) {
        throw new Exception('Foo failed to work properly.');
    } else if (barFails()) {
        throw new Exception('Bar failed this time.');
    }

    return "blahblah";
}

You can also subclass the Exception class to provide even more specificity, and you can detect which one by using a try-catch block. In general, I think it's better to use Object-Oriented principles like this. It produces code that's much clearer and maintainable, especially 6 months down the line after you've completely forgotten why you wrote your code the way you did.

class FooException extends Exception {
    // nothing else needed here
}

class BarException extends Exception {
    // nothing else needed here
}

function doSomething() {
    if (fooFails()) {
        throw new FooException();
    } else if (barFails()) {
        throw new BarException();
    }

    return "blahblah";
}

Then you can use:

try {
    $output = doSomething();

} catch (FooException $e) {
    // respond to the FooException case

} catch (BarException $e) {
    // respond to the BarException case

} catch (Exception $e) {
    // respond to any and all other exceptions that might be thrown
}
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2  
It depends very much on what the functions do and whether the reason to return -1 is an actual exceptional reason. Exceptions are control-flow structures and usually signal errors and other conditions. If you have something as simple as looking for a substring in a string then I doubt throwing an exception when the substring isn't found is the right thing to do. –  Joey Jun 17 '12 at 16:07
    
Good points. But in the substring example, returning null or false work just as well. I'm not advocating using exceptions in every case, but when using null, false, 0, or something similar just won't cover the range of failure modes possible, exceptions may be the only clear way of communicating what happened. –  curtisdf Jun 17 '12 at 16:09
    
I've updated my answer for clarity especially regarding simple functions like you mentioned. –  curtisdf Jun 17 '12 at 16:23

That is a matter of taste. I personally prefer to use numbers. They look nicer for me.

But in some cases, the use of true and false is more preferable. Like this one:

function isXYZ($a) {
    if (...) return true;
    return false;
}
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