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I am using the below code to find the base address of a running process. It's within a timer control for other purposes. If the target process is not running I want to display "Process is not running" in the label text, but keep checking for the running process and when/if found continue with the next code block. I have tried a few ways I thought would work, such as a 'try' with exception handling, but the form I am using to hold the label just freezes, I am quit new to c#. Here is the code,

private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        #region BaseAddress
        Process[] test = Process.GetProcessesByName("process");
        int Base = test[0].MainModule.BaseAddress.ToInt32();
        #endregion
        //Other code
     }

The exception when run is: "IndexOutOfRange exception was unhandled" - Index was outside the bounds of the array. Hopefully someone can help. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rather than use a try–catch block to handle the error, you should check whether the process was found before trying to access it:

private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    #region BaseAddress
    Process[] test = Process.GetProcessesByName("process");
    if (test.Any())
    {
        // Process is running.
        int Base = test[0].MainModule.BaseAddress.ToInt32();
        // Perform any processing you require on the "Base" address here.
    }
    else
    {
         // Process is not running.
         // Display "Process is not running" in the label text.
    }
    #endregion
    //Other code
 }
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3  
There seems to be a real trend to use Linq anywhere it can be applied. I'm personally not a fan of that. An array has a property, Length, designed to reveal it's length directly. Why wrap that with a Linq extension method? –  Eric J. Jun 17 '12 at 16:25
    
Because the name of the LINQ method is more intention-revealing. Translate test.Any() to English: “Does the list contain any elements?” Translate test.Length > 0 to English: “Does the list contain more than zero elements?” Which would you prefer? –  Douglas Jun 17 '12 at 16:30
    
If I wanted to do this outside of timer1_Tick, what is the best way to do it? I have tried holding the code in a public class but it doesn't work for some reason. At the moment I am getting the error: the name Base does not eist in the current context throughout other codeblocks within the timer control –  user1166981 Jun 17 '12 at 16:32
    
"Does the array have any Length" is just as intention revealing, without adding an unnecessary function call. –  Eric J. Jun 17 '12 at 16:33
1  
Instead of Any() how about Some() or AFew() or MoreThanZero(). What a waste of CPU cycles. –  Steve Wellens Jun 17 '12 at 16:38
private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        #region BaseAddress
        Process[] test = Process.GetProcessesByName("process");
        if (test.Length > 0)
        {
            int Base = test[0].MainModule.BaseAddress.ToInt32();
        }
        else
        {
            myLabel.Text = "Process is not running";
        }
        #endregion
        //Other code
     }
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I think that the Process with the name "process" does not exist. You need to give a real processname. So the array does not contain any elements. Try debugging to see if the array contains any elements and add error handling or a verification that the array length is higher than 0 before doing the second line of your code.

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