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I have a Windows Azure Virtual Machine. I am able to view my ASP.Net website on the virtual machine (localhost URL). When I ping my Windows Azure Virtual Machine IP I get timeout error.

My domain name is registered with an ISP but I would like to use that domain on my VM website.

Is it possible?

I actually want to know: -

  1. How do I access my website outside the VM?

  2. I also would like to setup my DNS name.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

There are a couple of questions

  1. How do I access my web site outside the VM?

If you create a real Virtual Machine, based on Windows Server (I guess, since your site is ASP.NET), then you need to redirect traffic on port 80 to that machine. By default when you create VM only RDP is redirected to your VM, nothing else. You can achieve that in the ENDPOINTS tab of your VM settings:

In your Windows Azure portal: -

  1. Select the VM
  2. Click on ENDPOINTS
  3. Add ENDPOINT
  4. Type some name for the ENDPOINT, put 80 for public and private port

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2. I also would like to setup my DNS name.

I would normally use CNAME to point my www.mydomain.com to the myvmname.cloudapp.net, like with normal Cloud Service development.

However, if you really need to just run your ASP.NET website, I strongly recommend to try using the regular Cloud Service approach (with a WebRole) instead.

UPDATE

CNAME: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CNAME_record

I usually add a CNAME record for www.mydomain.com that points to mydeployment.cloudapp.net

You can use it from your domain registrar control panel.

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Thanks that sorted it out with the endpoint –  Krivahn Doss Jun 19 '12 at 17:10
    
Whats CNAME and how do I use it ? –  Krivahn Doss Jun 19 '12 at 17:11

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