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I have been trying to make this shape in CSS.

Ideally it will span the entire length of the browser window and probably extend outside the field of view to support larger screens and also be centered so that the angle does not change.

Anyone have any solutions?

enter image description here

Also I think I might run into a problem of the angle aliasing harshly. I might need to resort to using an image. Would like to use CSS though.

** Image Spelling Error. (Indefinitely not Inevitably)

share|improve this question
    
using css2 or 3? –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 20:40
    
Whatever Works is fine by me. –  Varazi Jun 17 '12 at 20:42
    
using css 3 gradient is simple then see: colorzilla.com/gradient-editor –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 20:47
    
see here for a fiddle with altered css3 gradient - note it will fallback gracefully BUT not display exactly as you want for all browsers jsfiddle.net/Q9pWr –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 20:53
    
I would stick with images if you need to have it full cross browser though.. there is one other option I know of which involves some head-screw method of using bevelled edge border colours to produce triangles of any size and dimension if you MUST use css only –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A solution that doesn't require CSS3 support:

jsfiddle demo

HTML

<div class="shape">
    <div class="top"></div>
    <div class="bottom"></div>
</div>

CSS

.shape {
    width:400px;
    margin:0 auto;
}
.top {
    height:0;
    border-width:0 0 150px 400px;
    border-style:solid;
    border-color:transparent #d71f55 #d71f55 transparent;
}
.bottom {
    height: 50px;
    background-color:#d71f55;
}

/* Support transparent border colors in IE6. */
* html .top {
    filter:chroma(color=#123456);
    border-top-color:#123456;
    border-left-color:#123456;
}

Note: You sometimes get excessive antialiasing of the diagonal in some browsers (like an exagerated blur or dropshadow). This trick can be a little unpredictable on modern browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using the border triangle method - saw this a long time ago in some javascript + css/dom 3d demo. nice! –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 21:03
1  
For a couple demos of this trick, see: forestpath.org/apps/webmotion/css-fg/… and forestpath.org/apps/webmotion/css-fg/… –  Matt Coughlin Jun 17 '12 at 21:08
    
ta for the link - again +1 ;) –  Paul Sullivan Jun 17 '12 at 21:11

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