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This question already has an answer here:

I'm tring to access a function of an instance which is in an arraylist. Is there any way to do that without using the class name of the instance?

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

class apple {
    int price;

    public void myFunction(int iPrice)
    {
        price=iPrice;
    }
}

class orange {
    int price;

    public void myFunction(int iPrice)
    {
        price=iPrice;
    }
}

public class main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List list= new ArrayList();

        //create 3 apple object to list
        list.add( new apple() );
        list.add( new apple() );
        list.add( new orange() );

        list.get(0).myFunction(1); /* Error: The method myFunction(int) is undefined for the type Object*/

    }
}

I know that;((apple) list.get(0)).myFunction(1); is a way but I'dont want to use any class name while calling the function.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Sean Patrick Floyd, Emil Vikström, Alex K, hoaz, Axel Mar 6 '14 at 16:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You need to learn OOP design concepts. – SLaks Jun 17 '12 at 20:55
1  
I have tried to explain you before. Why you don't asking what are you don't understanding? – alaster Jun 17 '12 at 20:59
1  
@alaster you are wrong, you tried to explain it to "mypolat", this time OP is "fadeir" ^_^ – Pshemo Jun 17 '12 at 21:02
    
why do you want to have multiple different objects in the same list? Better yet: why do you not want to use class names to explicitly state from which class or object you are referring, this goes against OOP – David Kroukamp Jun 17 '12 at 21:02
2  
@Pshemo and fadeir can't start a bounty to that question because of 1 reputation :) – ArtemStorozhuk Jun 17 '12 at 21:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to use generics, together with an abstract class or an interface:

abstract class Fruit {
    public abstract void myFunction(int price);
}

List<Fruit> list= new ArrayList<Fruit>();
share|improve this answer

Yes - you'll need to use generics, and interfaces.

The reason you need to "use" the class name at the moment is that Java is strongly typed. You can't call a method on an object, unless the object's type exposes such a method. As it is at the moment, when you get something out of a List it can be of any type - so the Java compiler can't be sure that list.get(0) is something that has a myFunction method.

So you use generic parameters to the list, to restrict what types of objects can be added. This way, when you retrieve an object it's of a known type, and so appropriate methods can be called. So - what type of objects does your list hold? Well, it's "fruits", but you don't have a concept for this yet.

So you can define an interface in order to describe "something that implements these methods". Let's define it like so:

public interface Fruit {
    void myFunction(int iPrice);
}

That's all there is to it. You'll need to change your definition of the classes to declare that they do indeed implement this interface (it's not automatic):

class Apple implements Fruit {
    // rest as before
    // ...
}

and the same for Orange. Now you can declare that your list holds Fruits, and when you get something out you can be sure it's a Fruit. And so you can call myFunction(int) on it.

So in the main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Fruit> list= new ArrayList<Fruit>();

    //create 3 apple object to list
    list.add( new Apple() );
    list.add( new Apple() );
    list.add( new Orange() );

    list.get(0).myFunction(1);
}
share|improve this answer

What you ask for is not possible in Java, not without reflection, that is. Or with a framework built on top of it, like an expression language parser. Java is a statically typed language, and the compiler won't let you call a method he doesn't see.

An alternative you could consider is the use of interfaces.

public interface Fruit{
    void doSomething(int i);
}

Now let both implementations implement that and you can call the method without knowing which class it is.

share|improve this answer

Since the answers that were given until now only cover solutions but not explain WHY that works i put it into very simple words for you what really happens behind the scenes:

There can be an arbitrary object in that list. This means, it could be an object without the method myFunction().

No, think of an class definition as a contract. If you generate a new Object of type apple like so

Apple apple = new Apple(); 
you are saying "I want a new object, that obeys all conventions of the type 'apple' and i want it to be a new apple". so, the compiler knows that your Apple type has to have that function, so you can call
apple.myFunction()
. But if you are saying
Object o = new Apple();
you are saying "i want a new object that obeys all conventions of the type 'object' and i want it to be an apple". You can do that, since all classes implicitly exent java.lang.Object, so a new Apple() is also a new object. But if you are tring to invoke
o.myFunction()
then the compiler says "Whoops, not possible. 'o' obeys all conventions of 'Object' and everything else is optional. And the contrct i have here for an Object does not include a method named myFunction".

Now, the same happens with your List. You are creating a list of Objects. The compiler only knows for certain that there are objects in this list - but can not make other assumptions.

you can, however, force the compiler to treat this specific object as an Apple by casting it using (Apple).

Another way to solve that would be by using generics, this means, by creating a new ArrayList<Apple>. This way you could only store apples in that list and list.get(x) would return an object that is known to conform to the standards for an Apple.

Now, if you create an interface Fruit that defines a method myFunction and create subclasses Apple, Banane and what so ever that implement Fruit. you can create a List of type Fruit and store both Apples and Bananas in it and easily call list.get(x).myFunction(), since every object in that list has to be a Friut and therefore has to have the method myFunction().

share|improve this answer

Maybe this is not best solution, but you can cast list.get(0) to apple:

if (list.get(0) instanceof apple)
{
    ( (apple)list.get(0) ).myFunction(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a great suggestion however OP said he didn't want to use the class names explicitly. But depending on his reason this is a viable solution! – David Kroukamp Jun 17 '12 at 21:04
    
@DavidKroukamp I disagree, to me the OP has explicitly asked for a way around this. – Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 17 '12 at 21:05
    
yes but what i ment was he said "I'dont want to use any class name while calling the function" but hey thats just technically. Hence why I asked the OP what he wants to do and why he 'doesnt' want to use them – David Kroukamp Jun 17 '12 at 21:07

If you really cant/don't want to use generics/casting/extending abstract class Fruit you can always try reflection :)

    List list = new ArrayList();

    // create 2 apple and 1 orange to list
    list.add(new apple());
    list.add(new apple());
    list.add(new orange());


    Object o=list.get(0);
    // if class of "o" object contains method "myFunction" we can call
    // it this way
    try {
        o.getClass().getDeclaredMethod("myFunction", int.class).invoke(o, 1);
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException | SecurityException
            | IllegalAccessException | IllegalArgumentException
            | InvocationTargetException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
share|improve this answer

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