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I have a UDP broadcast of some data. I'm able to open the following client in python 2.6.1, under OSX 10.6.8, and it works. I can catch the data, all is well.

But: this code "consumes" the port, in that I can't open another one, the 2nd attempt to bind fails... and I must allow for more than one listener. Here's the code that opens the port:

import select, socket
port = 58083        # port msg is broadcast upon

# Create listening port
# ---------------------
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
try:
    s.bind(('', port))
except:
     print 'failure to bind'
    s.close()
    raise
s.setblocking(0)

...Since UDP is intended for broadcast to multiple clients (among other things), I assume I'm doing something wrong. I just can't figure out what.

I found an example on activestate that suggested:

s.bind(('<broadcast>',port))

...but that simply fails every time. Binding to 0.0.0.0 works, but also suffers from the "one client" problem. Binding to the local IP (e.g. 192.168.1.100) doesn't work at all. Removing the bind doesn't work at all.

Anyone?

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2  
Define "doesn't work". –  EJP Jun 17 '12 at 21:31
    
binding to 192.168.1.100 returns "socket.error [Errno 48] Address already in use" when the second instance is launched. Removing the bind with 192.168.1.100 results in no broadcast reception. Removing the bind with '' as the ip address results in no reception. Adding the recommended line doesn't hurt client 1, but client 2 reports the error as I describe below. Using &lt;broadcast&gt; as the string gets me Errno 49 Can't assign requested address –  fyngyrz Jun 18 '12 at 0:09

1 Answer 1

If you need multiple processes to listen on 58083, you need to set SO_REUSEADDR on the socket before socket.bind()

import select, socket
port = 58083        # port msg is broadcast upon

# Create listening port
# ---------------------
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
s.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)  # Allow other processes to
                                                         #    bind to port
try:
    s.bind(('0.0.0.0', port))
except:
     print 'failure to bind'
    s.close()
    raise
s.setblocking(0)

After adding an infinite loop at the bottom, and running this twice on my linux server (once as root, and the other as unpriv user), I see:

root@tsunami# lsof | grep 58083
python    25908       root    3u     IPv4             284835      0t0        UDP *:58083
python    25945   mpenning    3u     IPv4             284850      0t0        UDP *:58083
root@tsunami#
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work: socket.error: [Errno 48] Address already in use –  fyngyrz Jun 17 '12 at 23:31
    
Can you run them both as the same user? –  fyngyrz Jun 18 '12 at 0:02
1  
Yes, I still don't see problems running as the same user –  Mike Pennington Jun 18 '12 at 0:09
1  
FYI, BSD had some problems with SO_REUSEADDR in the past, I'm not sure whether this could be affecting OS X... it is quite old –  Mike Pennington Jun 18 '12 at 0:16
1  
@fyngyrz you need to set that option on all sockets that you want to share the same port, not just the 2nd and subsequent ones. –  EJP Jun 19 '12 at 23:17

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