Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have three points, for example:

Start 194 171
Right 216 131
Left  216 203

I want to get all the points within that triangle. How would I do that efficiently?

share|improve this question
2  
Homework? ;) ... –  lukas Jun 17 '12 at 23:10
2  
What have you tried? –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 17 '12 at 23:10
1  
See if this suits you: stackoverflow.com/questions/2771670/… Interesting question that I'm facing myself. –  MasterMastic Jun 17 '12 at 23:16
2  
The key word you need for your Google search is "rasterization". A search for "triangle rasterization" yields some decent-looking results, for what it's worth. –  Stuart Golodetz Jun 17 '12 at 23:27
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Introduction:

The general idea was to get the triangle's edges (y-Wise) for every x in it's range, and then you have all the y's that exist within the triangle for every single x, which with simple conversion turns into all points within the triangle.

You can look at it as if you cut the triangle into stripes, each being of width 1. So for X=0, on the line between A and B, the Y is 6, and on the line between A and C, the Y is -2, so you can see that the stripe of X=0 is between -2 and 6. Therefore, you can tell that (0, -2) (0, -1) (0, 0) ... (0, 5) (0, 6) are all in the triangle. Doing that for X's between the smallest and the largest within the triangle, and you have all the points in the triangle!

Speed:

For the triangle (0, 0) (1, 8) (4, 6) - found 16 points.

Done 1,000,000 times in 3.68 seconds.

Implementation:

public IEnumerable<Point> PointsInTriangle(Point pt1, Point pt2, Point pt3)
{
    if (pt1.Y == pt2.Y && pt1.Y == pt3.Y)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("The given points must form a triangle.");
    }

    Point tmp;

    if (pt2.X < pt1.X)
    {
        tmp = pt1;
        pt1 = pt2;
        pt2 = tmp;
    }

    if (pt3.X < pt2.X)
    {
        tmp = pt2;
        pt2 = pt3;
        pt3 = tmp;

        if (pt2.X < pt1.X)
        {
            tmp = pt1;
            pt1 = pt2;
            pt2 = tmp;
        }
    }

    var baseFunc = CreateFunc(pt1, pt3);
    var line1Func = pt1.X == pt2.X ? (x => pt2.Y) : CreateFunc(pt1, pt2);

    for (var x = pt1.X; x < pt2.X; x++)
    {
        int maxY;
        int minY = GetRange(line1Func(x), baseFunc(x), out maxY);

        for (var y = minY; y <= maxY; y++)
        {
            yield return new Point(x, y);
        }
    }

    var line2Func = pt2.X == pt3.X ? (x => pt2.Y) : CreateFunc(pt2, pt3);

    for (var x = pt2.X; x <= pt3.X; x++)
    {
        int maxY;
        int minY = GetRange(line2Func(x), baseFunc(x), out maxY);

        for (var y = minY; y <= maxY; y++)
        {
            yield return new Point(x, y);
        }
    }
}

private int GetRange(double y1, double y2, out int maxY)
{
    if (y1 < y2)
    {
        maxY = (int)Math.Floor(y2);
        return (int)Math.Ceiling(y1);
    }

    maxY = (int)Math.Floor(y1);
    return (int)Math.Ceiling(y2);
}

private Func<int, double> CreateFunc(Point pt1, Point pt2)
{
    var y0 = pt1.Y;

    if (y0 == pt2.Y)
    {
        return x => y0;
    }

    var m = (double)(pt2.Y - y0) / (pt2.X - pt1.X);

    return x => m * (x - pt1.X) + y0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Haha this made me laugh. Respect. –  Kevin Wang Jun 18 '12 at 3:06
    
@KevinWang Oh, I see you've found my easter egg on the 12th pixel? Now, really, what? –  Yorye Nathan Jun 18 '12 at 3:18
    
Excellent stuff! This has helped me out tremendously. –  Kyle G. Jun 28 '13 at 16:15
    
Just a small correction: Since pt1.X (for example) is a double, the for loops should start like this: for (var x = Convert.ToInt32(pt1.X); x < pt2.X; x++) because line1Func(x) expects an int. –  Kyle G. Jun 28 '13 at 16:21
add comment

First of all, get the bounding box of the triangle:

// This is in psuedocode since I don't know c#
bbox[x1] = min(triangles[1][x], triangles[2][x], triangles[3][x])
bbox[x2] = max(triangles[1][x], triangles[2][x], triangles[3][x])
bbox[y1] = min(triangles[1][y], triangles[2][y], triangles[3][y])
bbox[y2] = max(triangles[1][y], triangles[2][y], triangles[3][y])

Now, for any given point (x,y):

if x < bbox[x1] or y < bbox[y1] or x > bbox[x2] or y > bbox[y2]
then it can't possibly be in the triangle

For all the remaining points, you can use a point-in-triangle algorithm like the ones presented here.

If you want all the points that are in the triangle, you can loop through all the points in the bounding box and see which ones are in and which are not.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.