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Java has LineNumberReader which lets me keep track of the line I am on, but how do I keep track of the byte (or char) position in a stream?

I want something similar to lseek(<fd>,0,SEEK_CUR) for files in C.

EDIT: I am reading a file using LineNumberReader in = new LineNumberReader(new FileReader(file)) and I want to be able to print something like "processed XX% of the file" every now and then. The easiest way I know is to look at the file.length() first and divide the current file position by it.

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What type of stream are you trying to use? A file stream a live comm. stream, etc...??? –  trumpetlicks Jun 17 '12 at 23:54
    
I can't imagine why you would want to know that nor how you could actually manage to figure that out. The fact that it is a stream makes it impossible to have a position since you are constantly receiving more. The most you could do is keep track of how many bytes you have read since establishing the stream via a simple integer and incrementing it. Perhaps if you gave us more detail about what your intent is ... –  Martin Tuskevicius Jun 17 '12 at 23:56
    
You could look into RandomAccessFile, but I don't know if it fits the stream you're looking at. –  Thomas Jun 18 '12 at 0:07
    
Can I make a LineNumberReader out of a RandomAccessFile? –  sds Jun 18 '12 at 1:34

1 Answer 1

I suggest extending FilterInputStream as follows

public class ByteCountingInputStream extends FilterInputStream {

    private long position = 0;

    protected ByteCountingInputStream(InputStream in) {
        super(in);
    }

    public long getPosition() {
        return position;
    }

    @Override
    public int read() throws IOException {
        int byteRead = super.read();
        if (byteRead > 0) {
            position++;
        }
        return byteRead;
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b) throws IOException {
        int bytesRead = super.read(b);
        if (bytesRead > 0) {
            position += bytesRead;
        }
        return bytesRead;
    }

    @Override
    public int read(byte[] b, int off, int len) throws IOException {
        int bytesRead = super.read(b, off, len);
        if (bytesRead > 0) {
            position += bytesRead;
        }
        return bytesRead;
    }

    @Override
    public long skip(long n) throws IOException {
        long skipped;
        skipped = super.skip(n);
        position += skipped;
        return skipped;
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void mark(int readlimit) {
        return;
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void reset() throws IOException {
        return;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean markSupported() {
        return false;
    }

}

And you would use it like this:

File f = new File("filename.txt");
ByteCountingInputStream bcis = new ByteCountingInputStream(new FileInputStream(f));
LineNumberReader lnr = new LineNumberReader(new InputStreamReader(bcis));
int chars = 0;
String line;
while ((line = lnr.readLine()) != null) {
    chars += line.length() + 2;
    System.out.println("Chars read: " + chars);
    System.out.println("Bytes read: " + bcis.getPosition());
}

You will notice a few things:

  1. This version counts bytes because it implements InputStream.
  2. It might just be easier to count the characters or bytes yourself in the client code.
  3. This code will count bytes as soon as they are read from the filesystem into a buffer even if they haven't been processed by the LineNumberReader. You could put count characters in a subclass of LineNumberReader instead to get around this. Unfortunately, you can't easily produce a percentage because, unlike bytes, there is no cheap way to know the number of characters in a file.
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1  
i believe Apache Commons IO has a counting input stream decorator. commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/org/apache/commons/io/input/… –  Judge Mental Jun 18 '12 at 4:04

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