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I am teaching myself C# and one of the current chapters challenges asks me to prompt the user for a string, write back the string, count the number of characters, the instances of the letter 'e' and finally the instances of all vowels. It gave a hint to use switch but I couldn't figure out how to do it. I did get it to work by doing it manually, but I don't think that's the point. :) How could I use a switch statement to reduce the number of typed lines?

Console.WriteLine("Please type a sentence and hit enter: ");

string myString = Console.ReadLine();

int letterCount = myString.Split('e').Length - 1;

Console.Clear();
Console.WriteLine("Thank you.  The sentence you entered was: \n\"{0}\"", myString);
Console.WriteLine("This sentence is {0} characters long.", myString.Length);
Console.WriteLine("It contains {0} instances of the letter \'e\'.", letterCount);

int vowelCount = 0;
int letterALower = myString.Split('a').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterALower;

int letterELower = myString.Split('e').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterELower;

int letterILower = myString.Split('i').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterILower;

int letterOLower = myString.Split('o').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterOLower;

int letterULower = myString.Split('u').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterULower;

int letterAUpper = myString.Split('A').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterAUpper;

int letterEUpper = myString.Split('E').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterEUpper;

int letterIUpper = myString.Split('I').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterIUpper;

int letterOUpper = myString.Split('O').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterOUpper;

int letterUUpper = myString.Split('U').Length - 1;
vowelCount += letterUUpper;

Console.WriteLine("There are {0} vowels used.", vowelCount);
Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this question
    
C# Switch - MSDN everything you need to know for this problem. Also have a look at loops –  mburn7 Jun 18 '12 at 0:17
    
Thanks but I have viewed this page and it didn't make sense with relation to this problem. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/06tc147t(v=vs.71).aspx –  Trido Jun 18 '12 at 0:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a simple solution:

string str = Console.ReadLine();
string low_str = str.ToLower();
Console.Clear();
Console.WriteLine("Thank you.  The sentence you entered was: \n\"{0}\"", str);
Console.WriteLine("This sentence is {0} characters long.", str.Length);

int vowelCount = 0;
int eCount = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < low_str.Length; i++)
{
    switch(low_str[i])
    {
        case 'e': eCount ++; vowelCount++; break;
        case 'a': vowelCount++; break;
        case 'o': vowelCount++; break;
        case 'i': vowelCount++; break;
        case 'u': vowelCount++; break;
        case 'y': vowelCount++; break;
    }
}

Console.WriteLine("It contains {0} instances of the letter \'e\'.", eCount);
Console.WriteLine("There are {0} vowels used.", vowelCount);
Console.ReadLine();

Notice that this could be done in an even fewer lines using this method (not the best way, but let's not go too deep into the framework details :) ):

int eCount = low_str.split(new char[]{'e'}) - 1;
int vowelCount = low_str.split(new char[]{'a','e','o','i','u','y'}) - 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you increasing eCount on all letters, and not just e? –  Delusional Logic Jun 18 '12 at 0:27
    
:) Copy-paste mistake. you are absolutely right. –  Samy Arous Jun 18 '12 at 0:28
    
Oh wow, pretty much rewrote my code because of this. Looks much cleaner and considering this chapter was on string manipulation, proved to be quite useful. It was awesome because I didn't think about copying the string to a new variable so that I could convert to lower case to better enable counting both upper and lower case vowels. Thanks very much. –  Trido Jun 18 '12 at 0:40
    
You are welcome :) –  Samy Arous Jun 18 '12 at 1:53
    
Why not this: case 'e': eCount++; vowelCount++; break; case 'a': case 'o': case 'i': case 'u': case 'y': vowelCount++; break; –  Mohayemin Jun 18 '12 at 10:47

I know this isn't a good answer to the question, but I couldn't resist a one liner!

inputString.ToLower().Count(s=>"aeiou".Contains(s)); //count the vowels
share|improve this answer

Something like this (pseudo code, not actual C#)?

foreach (c in mySentence)
{
  c = LowerCase(c);
  switch (c) {
    case 'a' :
    case 'e' :
    case 'i' :
    case 'o' :
    case 'u' :
      nVowels ++;
      break;
    case ' ' :
    case '\t' :
      nBlanks++;
      break;
    default :
      nChars++
      break;
  }

Here's a bit more info:

share|improve this answer

I personally would do it with foreach and an array or vowels. This way it's easy to expand, like this:

Char[] vowels = {'e', 'a', 'o', 'i', 'u', 'y'};
string str = Console.ReadLine();
string low_str = str.ToLower();
Console.Clear();
Console.WriteLine("Thank you.  The sentence you entered was: \n\"{0}\"", str);
Console.WriteLine("This sentence is {0} characters long.", str.Length);

int vowelCount = 0;
int eCount = 0;

foreach (char chara in low_str)
{
    foreach (char vowel in vowels)
    if (vowel == chara)
        vowelCount++;
    if (chara == 'e')
        eCount++;
}

Console.WriteLine("It contains {0} instances of the letter \'e\'.", eCount);
Console.WriteLine("There are {0} vowels used.", vowelCount);
Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this answer
    
While this is a valid answer to counting vowels in a string, it doesn't answer the question as to how to use switch in the counting. –  saluce Jun 18 '12 at 1:56
    
You are completely right, but i feel that it's important to get other ways around the problem as well. Given that the question had already been answered perfectly, I simply wanted to provide an alternative solution. –  Delusional Logic Jun 18 '12 at 10:52

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