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I'm used to Java so when i try to so something like this:

function subSection(pattern){
    this.total = 0;
    this.pattern = pattern;
    this.distance=0;
}

function enhancer(pattern){
    __proto__:subSection;
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

function silencer(pattern){
    __proto__:subSection;
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

var a = new enhancer("aaa");
document.write(a.distance)

I get "undefined". I thought i have inherited the total and distance data members

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Is there a particular reason why the enhancer and silencer functions, the latter of which isn't even used in your example, are exactly the same? –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:33
    
I'm curious... which browser were you using when you got the "undefined" response? –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:36
    
@natlee75 they represent something else but have same data members. so later in my code each will have a static member that counts the number of instances for example. This is just part of the code, and the browsers were chrom 16 & chromium 13 –  Tom Jun 18 '12 at 8:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
function subSection(pattern){
    this.total = 0;
    this.pattern = pattern;
    this.distance=100;
}

function enhancer(pattern){
    this.__proto__=new subSection(pattern);
}

function silencer(pattern){
    this.__proto__=new subSection(pattern);
}

var a = new enhancer("aaa");
document.write(a.distance)​;

But it's only a Mozilla proprietary property as RobG said.

DEMO.

Update:

function subSection(pattern){
    this.total = 0;
    this.pattern = pattern;
    this.distance=100;
}

function enhancer(pattern){
    function F(){};
    F.prototype = new subSection(pattern); // inherited subSection
    return new F();    
}

function silencer(pattern){
    function F(){};
    F.prototype = new subSection(pattern); // inherited subSection
    return new F();
}

var a = new enhancer("aaa");
document.write(a.distance)​;

DEMO.

Useful Links: here and here.

share|improve this answer
    
exactly what i was looking for –  Tom Jun 18 '12 at 1:15
    
Glad it helped you, thanks :-) –  WereWolf - The Alpha Jun 18 '12 at 1:15
1  
Webkit browsers also support the proto property, as does Opera. I'm guessing the problem occurred in Internet Explorer. :-) –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:47

Don't use __proto__, it's a Mozilla proprietary property (copied by a few others) and is deprecated. Assign to construtor.prototpye.

The line:

> __proto__:subSection;

is not assigning anything to anything, it is a label (__proto__) followed by a statement subSection that is a reference to the subSection function that is not assigned to anything.

You seem not to understand prototype inheritance, try Douglas Crockford's Prototypal Inheritance in JavaScript

The following might be something like what you are trying to do, there must be a thousand similar questions here:

function SubSection(pattern) {
    this.pattern = pattern;
    this.total = 0;
    this.distance=0;
}

// Add a method to subSection.prototype
SubSection.prototype.getDistance = function() {
  return this.distance;
}

function Enhancer(pattern) {
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

// To make enhancer inherit from subSection, make its prototype
// an instance of subSection
Enhancer.prototype = new SubSection();

var a = new Enhancer("aaa");

document.write(a.getDistance()); // 0

Oh, and by convention, constructor names start with a capital letter.

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Where are you calling Enhancer.prototype = new SubSection(); from? where should i put that in my code so another programmer will get it? –  Tom Jun 18 '12 at 1:07
    
@Tom - It doesn't matter where you call that line of code assuming that all of the code is in the global namespace. In JavaScript function declarations are hoisted to the top of their scope so no matter where the SubSection and Enhancer functions are declared they will be treated by JavaScript as if they were declared right at the very beginning of the script. Enhancer.prototype = new SubSection() can be invoked before, after or in between the function declarations. –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:50
    
While function declarations are processed before any code is executed and you can put them anywhere in the same script block (more or less), it's a good habit to put them in order so the function is declared immediately above where the prototype modified (per the code above). I find that much more readable and easier to understand. –  RobG Jun 18 '12 at 15:22

you should use prototype inheritance for your objects. i would take your enhancer object and define it like this:

    //create Enhancer object
function Enhancer(pattern){
    this.subSection(pattern);    
}

//extend Enhancer with object methods
Enhancer.prototype = {

   subSection: function(pattern){
         this.pattern = pattern;
         this.total = 0;        
         this.distance=0;
  }

};

so here's what i'm going in this code:

  1. i'm defining the Enhancer object with a function. notice i capitalize "Enhancer" to signify "object" for this data structure.
  2. i take the "pattern" value passed to the object and use it to invoke Enhancer.subSection(); i can invoke .subSection() as a method of Enhancer object because i defined it as it's method with .prototype.

here's a working fiddle example of this approach

share|improve this answer
    
thanks chris! but this means alot of code repetition when making 10 classes that inherit the same thing –  Tom Jun 18 '12 at 1:15
    
Practically everything in JavaScript is an object. Arrays, strings, dates, numbers and functions are all objects. Capitalization of "Enhancer" is a convention generally used to indicate that a particular function will act as a constructor that returns an instance of that object. –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:26
    
@Tom - This technique wouldn't require any code repetition if Enhancer.prototype.subSection were assigned your subSection function. –  natlee75 Jun 18 '12 at 3:32

Generally speaking properties like total and distance which are meant to be initialized to the exact same value for every instance of the subSection object should be defined on the prototype rather than in the constructor.

An object's prototype is basically a "template" upon which every instance of that object is based. Every instance has each property and method defined on the prototype.

Thus the three "classes" (JavaScript doesn't have classes as defined in classical inheritance languages like Java but sometimes it's easier for people accustomed to those languages to use the terminology) should be declared as follows:

function subSection(pattern) {
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

function enhancer(pattern) {
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

function silencer(pattern) {
    this.pattern = pattern;
}

Move total and distance out of the subSection constructor and into the subSection prototype:

subSection.prototype.total = 0;
subSection.prototype.distance = 0;

The next step is to set up prototypal inheritance between subSection, enhancer and silencer using a no-op function as a sort of proxy between them:

function fn() {}
fn.prototype = subSection.prototype;

enhancer.prototype = new fn();
silencer.prototype = new fn();

Finally, set the constructor property of the enhancer and silencer prototypes to the correct objects so that instances' constructor properties refer to the proper constructor function. If we don't take this step, then any instance of enhancer or silencer will incorrectly refer to the subSection constructor.

enhancer.prototype.constructor = enhancer;
silencer.prototype.constructor = silencer;

Now we can instantiate the enhancer and silencer objects, and the resulting instances will have total and distance properties as well as a constructor property that refers to the respective object.

var a, b;
a = new enhancer('aaaa');
b = new silencer('bbbb');
console.log(a.total + ', ' + a.distance); // 0, 0
console.log(b.total + ', ' + b.distance); // 0, 0
console.log(a.constructor); // (string representation of enhancer constructor)

The reason we use the fn function as a proxy during the inheritance process is because an object should be able to inherit from another object that doesn't necessarily have the same set of constructor arguments.

Let's say we have the following two constructors:

function Person(name, age, hometown) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
    this.hometown = hometown;
}

function Employee(name, company, title) {
    this.name = name;
    this.company = company;
    this.title = title;
}

Employee should be able to inherit from Person even though they don't share the same set of constructor arguments. If we simply set Employee.prototype to equal a new instance of Person, the Employee prototype would have three undefined properties name, age and hometown.

Employee.prototype = new Person; // name, age and hometown are undefined
var e = new Employee('John Smith', 'New York Times', 'editor'); // e's prototype has undefined properties name, age and hometown

By using the no-op function fn (we can name it practically anything we want to), we end up with a clean prototype for each instance since fn as a constructor doesn't expect any arguments.

This isn't necessary, but it's a cleaner way to set up prototypal inheritance: there isn't much of a reason to clutter a prototype with undefined properties.

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